After the Fall: The Pursuit of Democracy in Central Europe

By Jeffrey C. Goldfarb | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
What's Left? What's Right?

On November 9, 1990, through a series of accidents, I found myself having a philosophical, discussion with the Czechoslovak minister of the interior, Jan langoš. The circumstances leading to our meeting, and the substance of this discussion, nicely represent the complex and ironic framework of the post-totalitarian political situation.

I went to Czechoslovakia one year after the "Velvet Revolution" (so named by Václav Havel) for three reasons: to help my Slovak colleagues initiate a branch of the democracy seminar in Bratislava; to give lectures in Bratislava and Prague on recent developments in the sociology of politics and culture as part of a New School initiative to reconstitute the social sciences in Eastern and Central Europe; and to take a look at Slovak nationalism and its impact on the formation of Czechoslovakia's new democracy. The arrangements for my visit proved to be quite faulty. The person who was supposed to meet me

-52-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
After the Fall: The Pursuit of Democracy in Central Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface xi
  • INTRODUCTION Then and Now 1
  • I POLITICS 11
  • Chapter 1 Civil Society "As If" 13
  • Chapter 2 Post-Totalitarian Politics 28
  • Chapter 3 Ideology Ends Again 37
  • Chapter 4 What's Left? What's Right? 52
  • II LEADERSHIP 63
  • Chapter 5 Havel to the Castle 65
  • Chapter 6 Democratic Dialogue 74
  • Chapter 7 Wałęsa: Washington or Piłsudski? 86
  • III NATION 97
  • Chapter 8 the Problem of Nationalism: on the Road to Harmony with the Minister of the Interior 99
  • Chapter 9 the Dialectics of False Solutions 110
  • Chapter 10 Europe 119
  • IV RELIGION 139
  • Chapter 11 the Church Against the State 141
  • Chapter 12 the Jewish Question 155
  • V THE ECONOMY 167
  • Chapter 13 Anti-Economic Practices 169
  • Chapter 14 on the Road to Capitalism? 185
  • Chapter 15 History and Class Consciousness 196
  • VI CULTURE 213
  • Chapter 16 Against Despair 215
  • Chapter 17 the Institutionalization of Cultural Imagination 227
  • EPILOGUE Toward a New Civilized Social Order 238
  • Bibliographic Note 253
  • Index 257
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.