The Literature of Travel in the Japanese Rediscovery of China, 1862-1945

By Joshua A. Fogel | Go to book overview

TWO
First Contacts: The Travelers Aboard the 'Senzaimaru' and Other Early Accounts

The first time we crossed [the sea to China], the intimacy we felt [with the Chinese] was really like that between old friends. . . . I think that in our hearts Japanese and Chinese get along naturally.

--Nōtomi Kaijirō1 ( 1844-1918)

The Genre of Travelogues in Modern Sino-Japanese Relations

It is significant that Japanese travel to China and the consequent travel writing about China recommenced when both countries were in apparent states of decline. The Tokugawa shogunate was looking for future commercial ties in a world that seemed to have long passed it by--which is why the first mission went to a commercial center like Shanghai and not to the capital in Beijing--and the Manchus were in no position to restrict Japanese entrance into China's busiest commercial port. Several of those aboard that first official mission to China in 1862 had witnessed firsthand the Taiping Rebellion ( 1851-65) and would play major roles in the Meiji Restoration several years later. As the period under study progressed, though, both Japan and China began to implement concerted efforts to strengthen themselves for the new world. The comparative success of the former and comparative failure of the latter played a significant role in determining the agenda for future travelers.

Who traveled to China from 1862 onward? Where did they go in China and why? Why did some of them write travel accounts and others, the overwhelming majority, choose not to do so? Whom did they meet in China? What did they see, or, rather, what did they describe having seen? For whom did they write their trip reports? How conscious were they of fitting into traditions of Japanese travel in China, and what impact might that have had on their accounts? These are among the many questions we confront in the effort to understand the burgeoning Japanese travel literature about China.

Before Japanese travel writers could even become aware of the variety of

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Literature of Travel in the Japanese Rediscovery of China, 1862-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 420

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.