The Literature of Travel in the Japanese Rediscovery of China, 1862-1945

By Joshua A. Fogel | Go to book overview

FOUR
Travel Writing and the Changing Nature of Sino-Japanese Relations

There appears to have been a lull in travel, or at least in travel reportage, in the mid-1890s, but by the end of the decade both had clearly picked up. From the 1880s the Japanese government had been looking to expand its sphere of influence in East Asia, largely at Korea's expense. Since the Qing government considered Korea effectively within China's orb, a Sino-Japanese conflict brewed beneath the surface for over a decade, shooting off sparks but little fire, abating only with the efforts of diplomats. Full-fledged war finally erupted in 1894, and the forces of the Japanese army and navy won quick and decisive victories over the Chinese. These victories translated into territorial concessions demanded and won at the negotiations that concluded in the Treaty of Shimonoseki.

After Japan's military victory over China in 1895, its newly won rights and privileges on the Korean peninsula made travel in a more northerly direction increasingly attractive. This inclination became a dominant trend after the Japanese victory in the Russo-Japanese War ten years later and the acquisition of a special Japanese position in Manchuria. One of the early Japanese travelers to this region, Ogoshi Keiriku ( 1866-1929), went to Manchuria from April to May 1898 and again the following year from April to July. Ogoshi's travels were more on the order of explorations: the area lacked even the minimal accommodations an ordinary traveler might expect. His account chronicled the trek his party made all the way to Tibet and countless places in between, but it was Manchuria that most concerned him. He described at length the railway and other transport networks of the region, especially in Manchuria where Japanese were still not allowed to travel on Russian trains. He visited cities, such as Harbin, that had just come into

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Literature of Travel in the Japanese Rediscovery of China, 1862-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 420

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.