Land Reform and Working-Class Experience in Britain and the United States, 1800-1862

By Jamie L. Bronstein | Go to book overview

7
The Land Plans, Politics, and the Press

Were the name of Chartism altered to some other ism, still preserving however the principles whole and entire, how many thousands of persons would exclaim, "Ah, this is indeed a glorious system! I shall give my instantaneous adhesion to it." . . . Those who have been taught by influential friends, by habit, by the press, and by constant outpourings of aristocratic and middle class virulence to look upon Chartism as a monstrosity and its adherents as brigands, would rush to array themselves under the standard of the same doctrine with another name.

--Reynolds' Political Instructor1

Resolved, That the land monopoly is at the foundation of the state of things, and that it is the duty of the State, which is but another name for the people, to adopt the policy of land limitation . . .

-- 1851 Industrial Congress 2

In the case of American and British land reform, as I have tried to demonstrate, the ideologies developed were similar on both sides of the Atlantic, having come from a common storehouse of ideas; and organizational structures mirrored each other, having evolved through a process of transatlantic communication. Thus it is (at least in part) to the state and other institutional structures that the historian must look for an answer to the question of why in the end the paths of American and British working-class land reform diverged. 3 This chapter discusses the way in which political contexts, and oppositional public opinion managed by the middle-class press, influenced the course of radicalism. In Britain, an increasingly centralized and autonomous state was able to justify direct intervention into the working-class land-reform movement through a Select Committee investigation. Because working people were not considered to be free agents, the government had to protect

-207-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Land Reform and Working-Class Experience in Britain and the United States, 1800-1862
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.