Land Reform and Working-Class Experience in Britain and the United States, 1800-1862

By Jamie L. Bronstein | Go to book overview

Epilogue

The Chartist Land Plan and the Potters' Joint-Stock Emigration Society were short-lived, killed off by power politics and financial mismanagement. National Reform slogged on for almost twenty years before culminating an anticlimactic partial victory--partial because, while homestead was achieved, the original fears of the National Reformers about America's antidemocratic tendencies were never addressed. Yet nothing can erase this: for one bright moment in the 1840's workers on both sides of the Atlantic saw in land reform a shining future. As they sought to accommodate to, variously, the inception of a market economy and the increasing demands of industrialization, the question of the disposition of natural resources and its relationship to the quality of their lives bulked large. In both Britain and the United States, the quest for free farms was in part a reaction to dissatisfaction with urban over- crowding and the paucity of good housing--yet there were larger philosophical questions being contested.

Although cotton factories already dotted the hills of Lancashire, even there the distribution of land was far from being a settled question. Having little to be enthusiastic about in their daily routines and in the unpredictability of their yearly survival, captivated by Feargus O'Connor, who had been their public voice since the late 1830's, workers envisioned an alternative but still possible mix of industry and agriculture which would raise wages for both city and country workers. In contrast, while removed by relative prosperity from the direct effects of industry, Massachusetts farmers, factory laborers, and skilled workers incorporated land redistribution into a series of demands which, when satisfied, would elevate the status of labor to its proper position in a democracy, by ensuring equal rights. American workers in particular strove to amalgamate the ideal of

-247-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Land Reform and Working-Class Experience in Britain and the United States, 1800-1862
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 374

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.