The Latin American Narcotics Trade and U.S. National Security

By Donald J. Mabry | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1:
1.
Amos A. Jordan and William J. Taylor Jr., American National Security. Policy and Process ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1981), 3.
2.
See Raphael Perl, Narcotics Control and the Use of U.S. Military Personnel. Operations in Bolivia and Issues for Congress ( Washington: Congressional Research Service, 1986), CRS-1.
3.
Margaret Daly Hayes, Latin America and the U.S. National Security Interest ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1984), 4.
4.
William J. Taylor Jr., "U.S. Security and Latin America: Arms Transfers and Military Doctrine," in Population Growth in Latin America and U.S. National Security, ed. by John Saunders ( Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1986), 271.
5.
David Westrate, DEA administrator, testimony on the Relationship of Drug Trafficking and Terrorism to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on the Judiciary, May 14, 1985, mimeographed, copy in possession of the author.
6.
Tad Szulc, Fidel. A Critical Portrait ( New York: William Morrow, 1986).
7.
See Rachael Ehrenfeld, "Narco-Terrorism: The Kremlin Connection," paper published by The Heritage Foundation, February, 1987; Rachael Ehrenfeld , "The Drug Terror Connection," unpublished paper; and Joseph D. Douglass Jr. , and General Major Jan Sejna, International Narcotics Trafficking. The Soviet Connection ( Washington: Security and Intelligence Foundation, 1987).
8.
Testimony given before the Senate Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics and International Communications and International Economic Policy, Trade, Oceans and Environment of the Committee on Foreign Relations offers convincing evidence of the validity of these assertions. See the committee's Drugs, Law Enforcement and Foreign Policy pt. 1 ( May 27, July 15, and Oct. 30, 1987), 100th Congress, 1st sess.; Drugs, Law Enforcement and Foreign Policy. Panama pt. 2 ( February 8, 9, 10, and 11, 1988), 100th Congress, 1st sess.; and Drugs, Law Enforcement and ForeignPolicy. The Cartel, Haiti and Central America

-163-

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