Global Corporate Intelligence: Opportunities, Technologies, and Threats in the 1990s

By George S. Roukis; Hugh Conway et al. | Go to book overview

11
Defense-related and Microcomputer Security

Robert S. Redmond

We should begin by recognizing that spying is a fact of life. Ronald W. Reagan, June 29, 19851

President Reagan made his statement after a serious breach of security in the Department of Defense (DOD) had been discovered. Spying, or industrial espionage in the corporate world, is an everyday fact of corporate life. Keeping sensitive corporate information secure from hostile or competitive domestic or foreign organizations is an essential element of business success. The major corporations of the world expend significant resources protecting their proprietary technologies.

Smaller organizations that do not have the financial capacity to provide a separate organizational structure to protect their sensitive technologies must tailor their corporate management structure. Typically this will mean a choice between a very small security staff or the security function being assigned as an additional responsibility to the administrative section. In either case, all of the corporate managers must be familiar with the basic principles and procedures of industrial security. This chapter concerns itself with these basics and is intended to provide a point of departure for the manager with a need to protect company technology.

Security "is a condition which results from the establishment of measures which protect designated information, personnel, systems, components and equipment against hostile persons, acts or influence." This North Atlantic Treaty

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