Historical Dictionary of the French Second Empire, 1852-1870

By William E. Echard | Go to book overview

R

RACHEL, stage name of ELISA RACHEL FELIX ( 1821-1858), the greatest tragedienne of the Second Empire; born toward the end of February 1821 in a wayside inn at Munf, Switzerland. Her parents were Jewish peddlers of French citizenship. Discovered singing in the streets of Lyons, Rachel was brought to Paris in 1831, where she studied religious music and then acting. Her first stage appearance in 1833 led to coaching by the actor Isidore Samson ( 1793-1871), who secured her admission to the Conservatoire at the end of October 1836. She made her debut at the Gymnase in La Vendéenne on 24 April 1837 and was engaged at the Comédie Française, against the resistance of most of the sociétaires, early in 1838. Her debut ( 12 June 1838) was as Camille in Horace. She seemed destined to be ignored when the critic Jules Janin, who had already noted her Gymnase performance, effusively hailed her in the Journal des débats of 10 September 1838. Her career from that moment soared.

Unprepossessing in appearance, Rachel had a true if essentially indescribable genius for classical tragedy, which almost single-handedly she restored to eminence in France. Her greatest roles were of Camille in Horace,

Emilie in Cinna
, Hermione in Andromaque, Eriphile in Iphigénie, Aménaïde in Tancréde, Monime in Mithridate, Roxane in Bajazet, and, above all, Phèdre (from 1843). In the many other roles she played (including Molière comedies), her success was not as great, although she undertook plays by such contemporary authors as Delphine Gay (Mme. de Girardin, 1804-1855), Ernest Legouvé ( 1807-1903), Eugène Scribe, Victor Hugo, Alexandre Dumas fils, Emile Augier, François Ponsard ( 1814-1867), Pierre Lebrun ( 1785-1873), Isidore Latour de Saint-Ybars ( 1810-1891), Auguste Maquet ( 1813-1888), Jules Lacroix ( 1809-1887), Armand Barthet ( 1820-1874), Hippolyte François Marie Romand (b. 1808), August Barbier ( 1805-1882), and Prosper Dinaux ( 1795-1859). Some thirteen roles were created for her, the last being Scribe La czarina ( 1855).

Despite her qualities of intelligence, character, vivacity, and sense of humor, Rachel was increasingly blamed for a lack of improvement and an unseemly greed for money. The first undoubtedly followed from her extreme precocity; the second led to unfortunate consequences. Certainly the actress was linked with a number of eminent, often prosperous, men of her time: Alfred de Musset

-534-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Historical Dictionary of the French Second Empire, 1852-1870
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Historical Dictionaries of French History ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations of Journals in References xv
  • The Dictionary 1
  • A 3
  • B 27
  • C 67
  • D 161
  • E 205
  • F 220
  • G 253
  • H 280
  • I 298
  • J 320
  • K 324
  • L 325
  • M 370
  • N 423
  • O 439
  • P 459
  • Q 531
  • R 534
  • S 585
  • T 643
  • U 673
  • V 676
  • W 700
  • Z 707
  • Chronology of the French Second Empire 711
  • Index 777
  • About the Editor 831
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 834

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.