Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest

By Katharine Berry Judson | Go to book overview

MYTHS AND LEGENDS OF CALIFORNIA AND THE OLD SOUTHWEST

COMPILED AND EDITED BY KATHARINE BERRY JUDSON

Introduction to the Bison Book Edition by Peter Iverson

ILLUSTRATED

University of Nebraska Press Lincoln and London

-i-

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Myths and Legends of California and the Old Southwest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • TABLE OF CONTENTS iii
  • Illustrations vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Preface 11
  • The Beginning of Newness 19
  • The Men of the Early Times 24
  • Creation and Longevity 26
  • Old Mole's Creation 27
  • The Creation of the World 29
  • Spider's Creation 32
  • The Gods and the Six Regions 36
  • How Old Man Above Created The World 37
  • The Search for the Middle and The Hardening of the World 39
  • Origin of Light 47
  • Pokoh, the Old Man 48
  • Thunder and Lightning 50
  • Creation of Man 51
  • The First Man and Woman 54
  • Old Man Above and the Grizzlies 55
  • The Creation of Man-Kind And The Flood 58
  • The Birds and the Flood 62
  • Legend of the Flood 63
  • The Great Flood 64
  • The Flood and the Theft of Fire 68
  • Legend of the Flood in Sacramento Valley 70
  • The Fable of the Animals 72
  • Coyote and Sun 75
  • The Course of the Sun 77
  • The Foxes and the Sun 80
  • The Theft of Fire 83
  • The Earth-Hardening After The Flood 85
  • The Origins of the Totems and Of Names 88
  • Traditions of Wanderings 89
  • The Migration of the Water People 92
  • Coyote and the Mesquite Beans 94
  • Origin of the Sierra Nevadas And Coast Range 95
  • Yosemite Valley 97
  • Legend of Tu-Tok-A-Nu′-La (el Capitan) 100
  • Legend of Tis-Se′-Yak (south Dome and North Dome) 102
  • Historic Tradition of the Upper Tuolumne 104
  • California Big Trees 106
  • The Children of Cloud 107
  • The Cloud People 110
  • Rain Song 113
  • Rain Song 114
  • Rain Song 115
  • The Corn Maidens 116
  • The Search for the Corn Maidens 120
  • Hasjelti and Hostjoghon 132
  • The Song-Hunter 134
  • Sand Painting of the Song-Hunter 137
  • The Guiding Duck and the Lake Of Death 140
  • Origin of Clear Lake 151
  • The Great Fire 152
  • Origin of the Raven and the Macaw - (Totems of summer and winter) 154
  • Coyote and the Hare 157
  • Coyote and the Quails 160
  • Coyote and the Fawns 162
  • How the Bluebird Got Its Color 164
  • Coyote's Eyes 166
  • Coyote and the Tortillas 168
  • Coyote as a Hunter 170
  • How the Rattlesnake Learned To Bite 175
  • Coyote and the Rattlesnake 178
  • Origin of the Saguaro and Palo Verde Cacti 182
  • The Thirsty Quails 184
  • The Boy and the Beast 185
  • Why the Apaches Are Fierce 187
  • Speech on the Warpath 188
  • The Spirit Land 192
  • Song of the Ghost Dance 193
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