Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition

By Marlene Deahl Merrill | Go to book overview

5
From Fort Ellis to Bottler's Ranch and Mammoth Hot Springs

SATURDAY, JULY 15

This morning I never woke until Dan [Gibson] called us. I finished my letter to Clara and sent it and also the one to Dr. [ Mills] with the letter to the Press enclosed. We did not get away from camp until about 10 o'clock. We have a hunter and a guide now, the latter being a Mexican.1

{We commenced to ascend at once, and soon found that we were going to have some very rough travelling. Instead of good stage roads we had a mountain trail, winding over the hills, passing now by rough projecting rocks, and anon descending into beautiful little valleys. The mountains rose around us on all sides, covered with dense forests of pines.}2

The rocks we passed today were sandstone. I got some fossils of plants on the way. After a ride of about 9 miles over a very rough road through the hills past the head of Spring Canyon and the coal mine we visited a few days [ago], we camped about 2 o'clock on a little creek. The weather is very hot. Negley, Huse, Moran, and Dawes took the wrong road, but Dawes and Negley suspecting they were wrong turned back and followed our tracks. Huse and Moran came into camp some time after we had eaten dinner. Charlie staid behind at the Post and will overtake us tomorrow with the Escort and Barlow's party.3 Jackson, Dixon, and Adams, who staid back in Bozeman, came into camp a couple of hours after the tents were pitched. . . .

This evening I went to the top of the hill (or rather mountain) back of Camp to see, at the request of the Doctor, whether or not the top most

____________________
Panorama 5. Butter Keg Canyon (today's Yankee Jim Canyon) with Yellowstone River in the foreground, July 20

-119-

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