Yellowstone and the Great West: Journals, Letters, and Images from the 1871 Hayden Expedition

By Marlene Deahl Merrill | Go to book overview

9
Pelican Valley, Baronett's Bridge, Bottler's Ranch, and Fort Ellis

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 23

I got up early this morning and finished packing specimens. Charlie told me there was a Slight earthquake last night while he was on guard. Jackson took two views of the camp. Everything being packed we started bidding farewell to Yellowstone Lake. The boys all called goodbye as we struck into the woods. Our way at first lay up towards the little lake. Instead of passing along it however we turned to the left and entered Pelican Creek valley. On the way we saw two elk. Jo and José went after them but did not get either of them. Pelican Creek valley is quite wide where we entered it, the creek winding through it in a beautiful serpentine manner. It is full of ducks and geese, some of which were shot. Shooting at the ducks did not seem to frighten them at all. There are a number of springs along the banks, some hot and some cold. I got a specimen from one, which is evidently at times a geyser. We followed the valley . . . {going upward, the ascent being very gradual. The creek became narrower and narrower until, at last, we reached the divide between it and the water that runs into East Fork.}1 We then struck across the country travelling until we reached a very beautiful small Lake [ Mirror Lake]2 on which we camped about [half] past 4 o'clock. We saw a deer on Pelican Creek and the Lieut. shot a second one. We saw numbers of places where elk had lain and their tracks were fresh in every direction. Joe Clark shot some geese this afternoon.

I pitched my tent under a spruce tree in a very nice place. Jo Clark killed an elk and José came in with a deerskin (blacktail) having hung up the meat. Smith also killed an elk. For dinner we ate two quarters of deer. Everyone was ravenously hungry. {If ever there was a disgusted person, it was our

____________________
Panorama 9. Bottler's Ranch, Emigrant Gulch, Emigrant Peak, July 17-20 and August 27-28

-168-

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