Chapter 3
Ethical Inquiry

Only if we develop a coherent perspective can we have any assurance that we will act with moral integrity and with the seriousness required by our power over others' lives.

-- Margaret Rhodes


PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS

An exploration of ethics in any field would be incomplete without an overview of its philosophical underpinnings. In this chapter, we will examine the philosophical frameworks out of which our ethical assumptions arise, review the research into ethics in psychology and social work, and discuss the conflicting values and ethical challenges experienced by adoption specialists.

The word ethics is derived from the Greek word ethos, meaning "character," and from the Latin word mores, meaning "customs." Thus, ethics historically can be seen as the expression of society's customs of right and good. A person who conforms to the law or to a formally-adopted code of ethics could be said to be operating ethically. Custom and law in a society do not always describe what is truly ethical, however. The law may permit actions that are unethical, while disallowing actions that are ethical. For example, the U.S. Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision declared slaves to be property, not citizens, a decision that was unethical but still legal (60 U.S. 393, 19 How. 393, 15 L. Ed. 691). A law or standard defining certain

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ethics in American Adoption
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction xxv
  • Part I Foundations 1
  • Chapter 1 Living the Experience 3
  • Chapter 2 Values in Adoption 27
  • Part II Explorations 71
  • Chapter 3 Ethical Inquiry 73
  • Chapter 4 Ethical Codes Influencing Adoption Practice 95
  • Part III Contentions 115
  • Chapter 5 When Professional Values Collide 117
  • Part IV Recommendations 133
  • Part V Challenges 161
  • Chapter 7 Challenges to Change 163
  • Appendix A 201
  • Appendix B 203
  • Glossary 211
  • References 217
  • Index 227
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.