Foreign Policy and the Press: An Analysis of the New York Times' Coverage of U.S. Foreign Policy

By Nicholas O. Berry | Go to book overview

3
Nixon and Cambodia: The Press and the President Part Company

In order to test the hypothesis this case has to be a foreign policy failure. Whether it is or not, some will dispute. Nixon never regretted his "incursion" into Cambodia and thought it accomplished what he hoped it would. He knew ahead of time it would cause a domestic uproar. Still, he made the decision on April 26, 1970, to go ahead. The press reported the formulation of the policy and its execution in a manner consistent with the president's frame of reference, situational analysis, and foreign policy. But scattered storm warnings were posted. Sixteen days before Nixon's final decision, the Times editorially warned the administration that a U.S. or South Vietnamese attack on North Vietnamese sanctuaries in Cambodia would widen the war. Two days later, on April 12, Senators John Sherman Cooper (R, KY) and Frank Church (D, ID) offered an amendment to the military appropriations bill to prohibit U.S. combat in Cambodia. They also feared a wider war in southeast Asia. Nixon, however, said his policy did not have the purpose of widening the war.

The press reported negatively in the outcome stage after the U.S.-South Vietnamese incursion took place and appeared to widen the war. The press was also reporting the reaction at home. Massive protests, including the killing of four students at Kent State University, appeared to dilute U.S. support for the administration's Southeast Asian policy.

Nixon made the case then and later in his memoirs that it was the North Vietnamese who widened the war. Even before the incursion, they had occupied large areas of Eastern Cambodia for use as a supply base, sanctuary, and staging area. After the overthrow of Prince Sihanouk on March 18, 1970, they had made common cause with Sihanouk and the fledgling Khmer Rouge guerrillas and had

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Foreign Policy and the Press: An Analysis of the New York Times' Coverage of U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1- Kennedy and the Bay of Pigs 1
  • 2- Johnson and Vietnam 27
  • 3- Nixon and Cambodia: the Press And the President Part Company 53
  • 4- Carter and the Iranian Hostages 81
  • 5- Reagan and the Intervention in Lebanon 109
  • 6- Findings, Implications, And Conclusions 139
  • Appendix A 153
  • Appendix B 155
  • Selected Bibliography 159
  • Index 161
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.