Foreign Policy and the Press: An Analysis of the New York Times' Coverage of U.S. Foreign Policy

By Nicholas O. Berry | Go to book overview

5
Reagan and the Intervention in Lebanon: An Unquestioning Press Finally Questions

Little of what goes on in the Middle East is what it appears to be. Little of what goes on is what the players say they are doing. Arabs and Israelis have a way with language, both using it as a mask. Arabs use it to please others, to posture, and to emote. Israelis use it to hide motives and interests, to make debating points, and to empirically describe reality. Both use it to bargain, but the differences in their use of language make understanding their bargaining a tangle for the uninitiated.

Those who venture into Middle East diplomacy constantly find themselves trying to sort out words and reality. Middle East diplomacy is almost an oxymoron. Nowhere else on earth is force so valued. Nowhere else are positions of strength so sought after. Nowhere else is language so much used as a weapon. No wonder the bloodletting has occupied the past sixty years without interruption. Agreements, understandings, and peace treaties serve only as temporary respites from the violence.

Every U.S. administration has plunged into the politics of the area since World War II. Few have had success. The Reagan administration was no exception.

The Israeli Defense Forces attacked the Palestinians and Syrians in Lebanon on June 6, 1982. Their stated interest was to secure their northern border. Their real interest was to create a friendly Lebanon under Christian allies and to create an unfriendly Palestine in Jordan under hostile Palestinians. Enough has leaked out about Peace for Gallilee II for us to flesh out the Israeli strategy.1 Defense Minister Ariel Sharon (the mastermind), Prime Minister Menachem Begin, and General Rafael Eitan secretly worked out the plan. They concluded an

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Foreign Policy and the Press: An Analysis of the New York Times' Coverage of U.S. Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1- Kennedy and the Bay of Pigs 1
  • 2- Johnson and Vietnam 27
  • 3- Nixon and Cambodia: the Press And the President Part Company 53
  • 4- Carter and the Iranian Hostages 81
  • 5- Reagan and the Intervention in Lebanon 109
  • 6- Findings, Implications, And Conclusions 139
  • Appendix A 153
  • Appendix B 155
  • Selected Bibliography 159
  • Index 161
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 164

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.