As the Twig Is Bent--Lasting Effects of Preschool Programs

By Consortium for Longitudinal Studies. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

It would be virtually impossible to individually acknowledge the hundreds of people who contributed to all these studies, some of which stretch back over 20 years. The authors have listed some of the people and organizations associated with their own projects; here we convey our thanks to some who assisted in the collaborative studies that linked these findings together.

The major support for the follow-up studies and their integration came from the Administration for Children, Youth and Families (ACYF), Office of Human Development Services, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (Grants 90C-1311 and 18-76-07843). Dr. Edith Grotberg, then ACYF's Director of Research and Evaluation, and Dr. Maiso Bryant and Dr. Bernard Brown, of her staff, provided invaluable help and advice in the 7-year period of the follow-up studies. Dr. Brown devoted hundreds of hours of his own time conducting independent data analyses and arranging for the presentation of these data at professional meetings.

Other direct federal financial support came from the Bureau of Maternal and Child Health of the U.S. Public Health Service (Grant MCT-004012-01-0) and from the U.S. Department of Labor (Grant 28-36-80-02). Here again we received valuable advice and critiques from their excellent research professionals.

During two periods the research teetered on the brink of insolvency, as the quantity and diversity of the data overwhelmed our initially too modest expectations of the extent to which subjects and data could be located. On both occasions, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation came to our rescue and further enabled us to carry out necessary activities that "fell between the cracks" of federal grants regulations. We will be grateful always to Dr. Roger Heyns and to Mr. Ted Lobman of the Foundation staff for their early optimism and continual encouragement.

-ix-

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