Conceptual Development: Piaget's Legacy

By Ellin Kofsky Scholnick; Katherine Nelson et al. | Go to book overview

Chapter 13
Sources of Conceptual Change

Susan Carey
New York University


THE VERY NOTION OF CONCEPTUAL CHANGE

Accounting for the emergence of novelty, of the genuinely new, is among the deepest mysteries facing students of development. Cognitive development consists, in part, of the acquisition of new representational resources, such as natural languages, written languages, mathematical and logical notations. Cognitive development also consists, in part, of the acquisition of new systems of concepts that allow the expression of thoughts previously unthinkable. This latter kind of novelty arises whenever knowledge acquisition involves conceptual change, and conceptual change concerns me here.

Conceptual change must be distinguished from cognitive development in general. Three expressions are often used interchangeably: knowledge acquisition, cognitive development, and conceptual change. In scientific discourse, we can adopt whatever terminology we wish as long as we are clear, but it is theoretically useful to distinguish among the three expressions and to give conceptual change the meaning that it receives in the literature on history and philosophy of science. Cognitive development is the broadest of the three: Strategy development, skill development, maturationally driven increases in information-processing capacity or executive function, knowledge acquisition all fall in the domain of the study of cognitive development. Knowledge acquisition is more focused: All changes in beliefs, mastery of new facts, and increases in implicit and explicit understanding exemplify knowledge acquisition. Finally, conceptual change is the most specific: It is

-293-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conceptual Development: Piaget's Legacy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter 1 1
  • Part 1 - How Should We Represent the Workings and Contents of the Mind? 21
  • Chapter 2 23
  • Chapter 3 53
  • Chapter 4 79
  • Chapter 5 103
  • Chapter 6 131
  • Part II - How Does the Child Construct a Mental Model during the Course of Development? What Is the Developmental Origin of This Model? 163
  • Chapter 7 165
  • Chapter 8 185
  • Chapter 9 209
  • Part III - What Accounts for the Novelties That Are the Products and Producers of Developmental Change? 241
  • Chapter 10 243
  • Chapter 11 253
  • Chapter 12 269
  • Chapter 13 293
  • Author Index 327
  • Subject Index 337
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.