Theodore Roosevelt: A Biography

By Henry F. Pringle | Go to book overview

Chapter VI
DRUMS OF WAR

BETWEEN the Progressive campaign and the World War, Roosevelt was at loose ends. He had no adequate outlet for energies which were as furious as ever, although the flesh was weaker. In 1912, and for the year or so which followed, Roosevelt believed again that his career had ended. "When it is evident that a leader's day is past," he wrote, "the one service that he can do is to step aside and leave the ground clear for the development of a successor." There were, he added, "certain things I can continue to say to small audiences in my writings, and where I think that these will be helpful and not hurtful, I shall continue to say them; but to make speeches on political subjects and try to take the lead in questions of party politics would be, for the time being at least, mischievous and not useful."1 If Roosevelt gave much thought to 1916 and 1920, if he considered his own future in any way, his letters give no hint of it. He was preparing his memoirs. In December, 1912, he was writing a lecture called "History as Literature"2 for delivery before the American Historical Society, of which he was president.

"None of its members, by the way, believe that history is literature," he wrote Cabot Lodge, resuming the lifelong correspondence that had been interrupted by the last campaign.3

To Roosevelt's undoubted relief, the period in which he combined a degree of scholarship with the activities of publicist and country gentleman was brief. During the comparative rustication one diverting controversy loomed. This was the libel action brought by Roosevelt against George J. Newett, the editor of an obscure weekly newspaper, Iron Ore, published at Ishpeming, Michigan. The suit was based on an item printed on October 12, 1912:

____________________
1
Bishop J. B., Op. cit., Vol II, p. 355.
2
Works, Vol. XII, pp. 3-24.
3
Lodge H. C., Op. cit., Vol. II, p. 427.

-572-

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Theodore Roosevelt: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Book I 1
  • Chapter I - Teedie 3
  • Chapter II - Growth 16
  • Chapter III - Thou Goddess, Indifference! 26
  • Chapter IV - Alice Lee 40
  • Chapter V - Butter and Jam 54
  • Chapter VI - I Rose like a Rocket 65
  • Chapter VII - Practical Politician 79
  • Chapter VIII - Gentleman Cowhand 92
  • Chapter IX - The Years Between 106
  • Chapter X - A Job Once More 120
  • Chapter XI - Sword of Righteousness 132
  • Chapter XII - The Nation in Peril 152
  • Chapter XIII - Lord of the Navy 165
  • Chapter XIV - A Bully Fight 181
  • Chapter XV - Reward for a Hero 201
  • Chapter XVI - Yearnings and Consummation 216
  • Book II 235
  • Chapter I - Middle of the Road 237
  • Chapter II - The First Attack 251
  • Chapter III - The Rights of Labor 264
  • Chapter IV - The Big Stick 279
  • Chapter V - Setting for a Melodrama 301
  • Chapter VI - I Took Panama 315
  • Chapter VII - Trimming Sail 339
  • Chapter VIII - The Imperial Years Begin 359
  • Chapter IX - Imperial Years 372
  • Chapter X - The Japanese Menace 398
  • Chapter XI - Malefactors of Great Wealth 413
  • Chapter XII - The Wicked Speculators 432
  • Chaper XIII - Substantial Justice 446
  • Chapter XIV - Handing Down the Law 465
  • Chapter XV - End of the Reign 476
  • Book III 495
  • Chapter I - The First Error 497
  • Chapter II - Among the Kings 508
  • Chapter III - Return Triumphant 525
  • Chapter IV - True Democracy 540
  • Chapter V - Battling for the Lord 553
  • Chapter VI - Drums of War 572
  • Chapter VII - The Final Blow 589
  • Appendix 605
  • Bibliography 607
  • Index 613
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