XVI
RESPONSIBILITY TALKS

CHILDREN have many special endowments, and of these the chiefest is to ask questions that their elders must skirmish to evade. Married people and aunts and uncles commonly discover this, but mere instinct does not guide one to it. A maiden of twenty-three will not necessarily divine it. Now except in one unhappy hour of stress and surprise, Miss Jessamine Buckner had been more than equal to life thus far. But never yet had she been shut up a whole day in one room with a boy of nine. Had this experience been hers, perhaps she would not have written to Mr. McLean the friendly and singular letter in which she hoped he was well, and said that she was very well, and how was dear little Billy? She was glad Mr. McLean had stayed away. That was just like his honorable nature, and what she expected of him. And she was perfectly happy at Separ, and "yours sincerely and always, 'Neighbor.' " Postscript. Talking of Billy Lusk--if Lin was busy with gathering the cattle, why not send Billy down to stop quietly with her. She would make him a bed in the ticket-office, and there she would

-236-

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Lin McLean
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Dedication *
  • Contents *
  • I - "VARIETY, YOU BET!" 1
  • II - HOW LIN WENT EAST 17
  • III - HOME TO THE SAGE-BRUSH 28
  • IV - THE NEW GIRL 42
  • V - THE WINNING OF THE BISCUIT-SHOOTER 62
  • Vl - HONEY-MOON LIN 81
  • VII - "YOU SAGE-BRUSH BIGAMIST!" 93
  • VIII - IN SEARCH OF CHRISTMAS 114
  • IX - SANTA-CLAUS LIN 131
  • X - YOUNG RESPONSIBILITY 145
  • XI - THE TRUE GIRL 161
  • XII - CONCERNING AN EMPTY 178
  • XIII - BROTHER NATE 195
  • XIV - SEPAR'S VIGILANTE 208
  • XV - "NEIGHBOR" 226
  • XVI - RESPONSIBILITY TALKS 236
  • XVII - RE-ENTER THE NEW GIRL 248
  • XVIII - "AMBROSIER. HONEY-DOO." 266
  • XIX - DESTINY AT DRYBONE 277
  • XX - "NEIGHBOR" AGAIN 301
  • IN THE AFTER-DAYS 304
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