Fair Play: Sports, Values, and Society

By Robert L. Simon | Go to book overview

5
Equality and Excellence in Sports

In Chapters 2, 3, and 4, an attempt has been made to develop, defend, and apply an ethic of competition in sports and athletics. In the next three chapters, our focus will shift from examination of ethical principles that should regulate competition in sports to an examination of the rights and responsibilities of participants. In this chapter, we will consider questions of just distribution in sports. Are there fundamental rights to share in the benefits of participation in sports? Does everyone, or at least everyone interested in playing, have a right to participate? Does the greater athletic ability of some entitle them to greater rewards, or at least more playing time, than others? In addressing these and related questions, issues involving the scope and nature of rights, the significance of equality, and the meaning of equity and social justice will face us. These questions will not only force us to confront issues of fairness and social justice in sports, but broader issues about the just and equitable society as well.

Throughout our discussion, it has been argued that competition in sports is not only ethical but also valuable when it involves a mutual quest for excellence among competitors. However, we have not yet considered issues of access to competitive sports, and distribution of the benefits and burdens of participation. In particular, do individuals have rights to participate in sports and to share in the benefits that participation promotes? Do communities have obligations to provide athletic facilities, such as swimming pools, so such rights to participation can be implemented? Are individuals entitled only to the use of whatever athletic facilities they can purchase on the open market? Are special rewards and opportunities that go to the athletically talented justified or are they in violation of justifiable norms of equal treatment?

Each of these questions involves the concept of equality. Do individuals have equal claims to participate in sports and share in the benefits? What significance should be attached to inequalities of talent and motivation? What are the requirements of equality in sports?

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fair Play: Sports, Values, and Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction- Philosophy of Sports 1
  • 2 - The Ethics of Competition 13
  • 3 - Cheating and Violence in Sports 37
  • 4 - Enhancing Performance through Drugs 71
  • 5 - Equality and Excellence in Sports 93
  • 6 - Sex Equality in Sports 123
  • 7 - Do Intercollegiate Athletics Belong on Campus? 151
  • 8 - Sports and Social Values 187
  • Notes 203
  • About the Book and Author 221
  • Index 223
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 229

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.