Fair Play: Sports, Values, and Society

By Robert L. Simon | Go to book overview

7
Do Intercollegiate Athletics Belong on Campus?

The NCAA college basketball tournament is a showcase for intercollegiate athletics. The games usually are not only well played but also often are thrilling contests decided only in the last few minutes of play. A case in point is the 1982 final game between Georgetown and the University of North Carolina, which was decided on a last-minute jump shot by then-freshman sensation Michael Jordan. The game was well contested and hard fought and the two universities had fine academic reputations. In addition, the competing coaches, John Thompson of Georgetown and Dean Smith of North Carolina, were known both for their knowledge of the game and also for their concern for the academic success and well-being of their players.

Thus, it may have appeared to many spectators as well as to the national television audience that intercollegiate athletics never had been in better shape. Unfortunately, if viewers did form such an impression, further reflection on recruiting scandals and academic deficiencies of athletes in many major college athletic programs, as well as on much that was to come in the 1980s, would have dispelled that impression.

Big-time intercollegiate athletics continues to enjoy great popularity and continues to be highly profitable for many institutions as well. Sale of rights to televise the NCAA men's basketball tournament were sold recently to the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) for over a billion dollars. Yet intercollegiate athletics continues to be plagued with major problems, particularly where the major intercollegiate athletic powers are involved. Many observers consider these problems so serious as to call the whole practice of intercollegiate athletics itself into serious moral question.

Thus, only a few months after North Carolina's victory over

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Fair Play: Sports, Values, and Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction- Philosophy of Sports 1
  • 2 - The Ethics of Competition 13
  • 3 - Cheating and Violence in Sports 37
  • 4 - Enhancing Performance through Drugs 71
  • 5 - Equality and Excellence in Sports 93
  • 6 - Sex Equality in Sports 123
  • 7 - Do Intercollegiate Athletics Belong on Campus? 151
  • 8 - Sports and Social Values 187
  • Notes 203
  • About the Book and Author 221
  • Index 223
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