The Secret Trauma: Incest in the Lives of Girls and Women

By Diana E. H. Russell | Go to book overview

Introduction to the 1999 Edition
The Great Incest War: Moving Beyond Polarization

The re-publication of The Secret Trauma could hardly be more timely. Although this book was published in 1986, the survey data on which it is based were gathered in 1978--well before incest was widely talked about and covered in the media. At that time, disclosures of incest were still frequently greeted with skepticism by clinicians, law enforcement officers, child protection workers and courts, and even by parents, teachers, and social workers. Nevertheless, an unprecedented 16 percent of the 930 randomly drawn women interviewed in my study reported having been sexually abused by a relative before the age of 18. The more general finding--that just over one in three (38 percent) of women in this study disclosed at least one experience of child sexual abuse--is now the most widely accepted estimate of the prevalence of child sexual abuse in the United States.

In the years following the publication of The Secret Trauma, however, the debate over incest escalated into a momentous and venomous controversy. As a result of such cases as the 1987 McMartin Preschool trial for the alleged satanic ritual abuse of more than 350 children by six perpetrators, and the 1994 recovered memory trial in which Holly Ramona charged her father with rape after her "memories" of these assaults emerged in therapy, many people's skepticism increased about the widespread claims of satanic ritual abuse and recovered memories of child sexual abuse (mostly incest). "The memory wars," or "the Great Incest War," as these battles have been called ( Armstrong 1994, Crews 1995, respectively), pitted the child sexual abuse incest recovery movement1 against the false memory movement. This movement was led by parents, many of whom had been charged with incestuous

____________________
1
Because it gets too cumbersome to routinely mention both incestuous abuse and extrafamial child sexual abuse, the term incestuous abuse should be understood to often include extrafamilial child sexual abuse as well.

-xvii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Secret Trauma: Incest in the Lives of Girls and Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 434

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.