Bangladesh: From a Nation to a State

By Craig Baxter | Go to book overview

diwani transferred from the nawab to the East India Company. Emperor Shah Alam II took that action in 1765 upon the death of Mir Jafar. With this, British rule in Bengal was assured, even though there remained the peculiarity of a quasifeudal relationship with the Mughal emperor through whose grace the diwani was exercised.17


Notes
1
A principal source for the period of Muslim rule in Bengal is the excellent work by Richard M. Eaton, The Rise of Islam and the Bengal Frontier, 1204- 1760 ( Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993).
3
Ibid., pp. 48-49. If Eaton's date of 1415 is correct, the visit would have taken place during the interregnum of the Raja Ganesh dynasty.
4
See ibid., pp. 63ff.
5
The term " Tripura" is used to denote two present-day areas: Hill Tripura, roughly the present Indian state of Tripura, and Tripura, roughly the present Bangladesh districts of Brahmanbaria, Comilla, Chandpur, Noakhali, and Feni.
6
The name is perhaps best remembered in the 24 Parganas District of West Bengal.
7
A sister of Man Singh was one of the wives of Akbar.
8
Sonargaon (literally, the "village of gold") had earlier been a provincial center for eastern Bengal in the Ilyas Shahi and Delhi sultanate periods. It was a center of the cotton textile industry but was later surpassed by Dhaka.
9
In British usage in India, the term "factory" refers to an agency for factoring--that is, trading--not a place where goods are manufactured.
10
See Eaton, p. 220, n. 84.
11
This is the justification for the move given in the Imperial Gazetteer of India, Provincial Series, Bengal ( 1909; reprint, New Delhi: Usha, 1984), vol. 1, p. 455.
13
See Rounaq Jahan, Pakistan, Failure in National Integration ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1972), pp. 38ff.
14
John Keay, The Honourable Company: A History of the English East India Company ( New York: Macmillan, 1991), p. 241.
15
Holden Furber, John Company at Work ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1948).
16
Keay, pp. 149-150.
17
Keay mentions the concern in London that this peculiarity might be interpreted as making King George III a feudatory of the Mughal emperor (ibid., p. 379)--interesting, but hardly a practical concern.

-26-

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Bangladesh: From a Nation to a State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • knowledgments xv
  • 1 - A Delta and its People 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Hindus and Buddhists 11
  • Notes 16
  • 3 - Bengal Under Muslim Rule 17
  • Notes 26
  • 4 - Bengal Under the Company 27
  • 5 - Bengal Under The Raj 35
  • 6 - Toward Independence and Partition 49
  • Notes 58
  • 7 A Province of Pakistan 61
  • Notes 80
  • 8 - Democracy, Authoritarianism, Limited Democracy, 1972-1982 83
  • Notes 105
  • 9 - Military Rule and Democracy Restored, 1982-1996 107
  • Notes 130
  • 10 - Economic and Social Development 131
  • Notes 143
  • 11 - Bangladesh in the World System 145
  • Notes 158
  • 12 - Democracy or Authoritarianism? Development or Stagnation 159
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliographic Note 163
  • About the Book and Author 167
  • Index 169
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