Bangladesh: From a Nation to a State

By Craig Baxter | Go to book overview

undertake development programs themselves display an important factor in development. Bangladeshi entrepreneurs' creating jobs and profits from the growing ready-made garment industry is another positive aspect.

It is heartening to see Bangladesh embrace the market economy rather than the stultifying socialism of its earlier years. There is a greater emphasis on human needs as more funds are devoted to education and health care, although the amount is still too small. And even if it is a long-term and costly task, Bangladesh is trying to strengthen its infrastructure.

The key point is that there is hope, and the needs of Bangladesh and its people are being attended to within the limits of time and cost. The risk is not an economic or even a social one. The risk is that the political leaders of Bangladesh will continue to expend their energies in their hostility toward one another and not in cooperating as much as possible given their differing views on the development of the political, economic, and social systems, even though these differences are now much less than before.

One of Dhaka's most noted commentators, Mizanur Rahman Shelley, has written: "The lack of a worldwide civil society . . . is why people of struggling Bangladesh are caged by 72- and 96-hour hartals (general strikes) that virtually close down the impoverished country. The reason of their predicament is the impractical stubbornness of their leaders to come to terms as to how a civil society should resolve its problems in a civilized manner."1 Bangladeshi leaders need a strong dose of the medicine Shelley recommends if democracy and development are to continue.


Notes
1
Independent ( Dhaka), October 24, 1995.

-161-

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Bangladesh: From a Nation to a State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables and Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • knowledgments xv
  • 1 - A Delta and its People 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Hindus and Buddhists 11
  • Notes 16
  • 3 - Bengal Under Muslim Rule 17
  • Notes 26
  • 4 - Bengal Under the Company 27
  • 5 - Bengal Under The Raj 35
  • 6 - Toward Independence and Partition 49
  • Notes 58
  • 7 A Province of Pakistan 61
  • Notes 80
  • 8 - Democracy, Authoritarianism, Limited Democracy, 1972-1982 83
  • Notes 105
  • 9 - Military Rule and Democracy Restored, 1982-1996 107
  • Notes 130
  • 10 - Economic and Social Development 131
  • Notes 143
  • 11 - Bangladesh in the World System 145
  • Notes 158
  • 12 - Democracy or Authoritarianism? Development or Stagnation 159
  • Notes 161
  • Bibliographic Note 163
  • About the Book and Author 167
  • Index 169
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