Madagascar: Conflicts of Authority in the Great Island

By Philip M. Allen | Go to book overview

of that republic may be able to flourish without stifling preoccupation with European forms, standards, and examples.


NOTES
1
The varieties of Malagasy ethnicity and culture have been well documented for the past two centuries -- flowing into and out of the politico-cultural watershed represented by the reorganizations of the Merina king Andrianampoinimerina. They continue to be studied by a highly collegial Franco-Malagasy research establishment, penetrated by an occasional British or other vazaha anthropologist. For instance, see bibliographical entries for Yoshio Abé; Maurice Bloch, Raymond Décary; Gillian Feeley-Harnik; Richard Huntington; Conrad Phillip Kottack and others; John Mack; Jean Pavageau; S. Raharijaona and Pierre Vérin; Tovonirina Rakotondrabe; Pierre Vérin. Rakontondrabe's presentation to the University of Antananarivo's May 1993 Colloquium on Democracy and Development in the Southwest Indian Ocean and in Africa, entitled "Au delà de l'ethnie: Ethnies, état-nation et démocratie à Madagascar", represents the best discussion of the contemporary politics of national unity and regionalism.
2
See Pascal Chaigneau, Madagascar, de la premièe république à l'orientation socialiste: Processus et consequences d'une évolution politique (Thèse IIIème cycle en sociologie politique, Univ. de Paris X, 1981), p. 77; Maurice Bloch, Placing the Dead: Tombs, Ancestral Villages and Kinship Organization in Madagascar ( London and New York: Seminar Press, 1972), p. 36; Gillian Feeley-Harnik, A Green Estate: Restoring Independence in Madagascar ( Washington and London: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991), pp. 156-159; Gérard Althabe, Oppression et liberation dans l'imaginaire: Les communauts villageoises de la côte orientale de Madagascar ( Paris: Maspero, 1969); Jean-Pierre Raison, Les hautes terres de Madagascar ( Paris: ORSTOM-Karthala, 1984).
3
See Pierre Vérin, Austronesian Contributions to the Culture of Madagascar: Some Archaeological Problems, in H. Neville Chittick and Robert I. Rotberg, eds., East Africa and the Orient: Cultural Syntheses in Pre-Colonial Times ( New York and London: Africana, 1975), p. 167.
4
Census calculations are hazardous at best; most population data depend on extrapolations from the 1970 census.
5
Pascal Chaigneau, Rivalités politiques et socialisme à Madagascar ( Paris: CHEAM, 1985), p. 18; for even stronger indictments of the colonial administration's role in creat- Mg ethnic conflict, see Antoine Bouillon, Madagascar, le colonisé et son 'âme': Essai sur le discours psychologique colonial ( Paris: Harmattan, 1981) and Robert Archer≅, Madagascar depuis 1972: La marche d'une révolution ( Paris: Harmattan, 1978), esp. pp. 20-25.
6
See Althabe, Oppression et liberation, pp. 62-64.
7
Maurice Bloch, From Blessing to Violence: History and Ideology in the Circumcision Ritual of the Merina of Madagascar ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986), p. 164; see also Bloch, Placing the Dead, pp. 26-29.
8
Patrick Rajoelina and Alain Ramelet, Madagascar: La grande ile ( Paris: Harmattan, 1989), p. 79. Ethnologists have classified Malagasy groups into any number from eighteen to forty-eight; for detailed histories of the major groups see Edouard Ralaimihoatra , Histoire de Madagascar, 4th ed. (Antananarivo: Librairie de Madagascar, 1982), pts. 1 and 2.
9
See Frederic L. Pryor, Malawi and Madagascar: The Political Economy of Poverty, Equity, and Growth ( Washington, D.C.: Oxford University Press for World Bank, 1990), pp. 200-201.

-162-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Madagascar: Conflicts of Authority in the Great Island
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Tables and Illustrations xi
  • Preface and Acknowledgments xiii
  • 1 - The Virtue of Insularity 1
  • Notes 26
  • 2 - Politics: From Paternalism to Revolution 31
  • Notes 74
  • 3 - Ratsiraka's Republic: Revolution as Myth 79
  • Notes 117
  • 4 - Society in Modern Madagascar 121
  • Notes 162
  • 5 - Madagascar's Economy: Flight from Reality 168
  • Notes 213
  • 6 - Conclusion: Continuity as Revolution 220
  • Notes 236
  • Glossary 239
  • Selected Bibliography 242
  • About the Book and Author 247
  • Index 248
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.