Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi

By Howard Gardner | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1. Chance Encounters in Wartime Zurich
Page
3 The following quotations are from Stoppard, 1975: "Zurich during the war . . ." is on p. 98; "Literature must become party literature . . ." is on pp. 85-87; "Doing the things . . ." is on p. 38; "You are an overexcited . . ." is on p. 62.
4 For more on Mairaux's museum without walls, see Malraux, 1963.
4 For more on McLuhan's global village, see McLuhan, 1964.
7 For a discussion of different dates for modernism and the modern era, see Johnson, 1991; Lutz, 1991; and Toulmin, 1990.
11 For more on Eliot's borderline mental disturbance, see Lutz, 1991.
14 On challenges to the notion of a zeitgeist, see Gombrich, 1979, 1991; and Popper, 1964. For a defense of this notion, see Boring, 1950; and Kroeber, 1944.
14-15 For a discussion of eras characterized by underlying assumptions about the nature of knowledge, see Foucault, 1970.
16 For more on standard stories of the end of the century and the rise of the modern era, see Berman, 1988; Dangerfield, 1935; Eksteins, 1989; Schorske, 1979; Strachey, 1988; and Vamedoe, 1986. For more on revisionist views, see Gay, 1984; Showalter, 1990; Toulmin, 1990; and Wilson , 1990.
17 For more on Vienna from 1890 to 1920, see Janik and Toulmin, 1973; Schorske, 1979; and Varnedoe, 1986. For views of other cities, see Gyongyi and Jobbagyi, 1989; and Lukacs, 1991.
17 For details on Eksteins's argument, see Eksteins, 1989.
18 On the necessity of challenging convention, see Martindale, 1990.

Chapter 2. Approaches to Creativity
19 For more on studies of intelligence, see Block and Dworkin, 1976; Gardner , 1983; and Sternberg, 1985.

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Creating Minds: An Anatomy of Creativity Seen through the Lives of Freud, Einstein, Picasso, Stravinsky, Eliot, Graham, and Gandhi
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Chance Encounters in Wartime Zurich 3
  • 2 - Approaches to Creativity 19
  • Part II - The Creators of the Modern Era 47
  • 3 - Sigmund Freud: Alone with the World 49
  • 4 - Albert Einstein: The Perennial Child 87
  • 5 - Pablo Picasso: Prodigiousness and Beyond 137
  • 6 - Igor Stravinsky: The Poetics and Politics of Music 187
  • 7 - T. S. Eliot: The Marginal Master 227
  • 8 - Martha Graham: Discovering the Dance of America 265
  • 9 - Mahatma Gandhi: A Hold upon Others 311
  • Part III - Conclusion 357
  • 10 - Creativity across the Domains 359
  • Epilogue: - The Modern Era and Beyond 391
  • Notes 407
  • Bibliography 435
  • Name Index 451
  • Subject Index 458
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