Taiwan: Nation-State or Province?

By John F. Copper | Go to book overview

5 THE ECONOMY

Several centuries ago Taiwan prospered as a center for trade and commerce in East Asia. In the late 1800s, and then under Japanese control from 1895 to 1945, Taiwan again thrived economically, surpassing all of East Asia except for Japan. But after World War II, Taiwan's economy deteriorated. In the 1950s and even into the 1960s, Taiwan did not appear to have good prospects for economic de­ velopment. In fact, predictions at that time were very pessimistic because of the island's lack of resources, an unfavorable land-to-population ratio, a shortage of capital, and a discredited political leadership. However, in the mid-1960s Taiwan's economy took off, its subsequent growth the envy of the world. Many used the term "miracle" to describe Taiwan's economic success, which triggered far-reaching social and political changes. Today, although growth has slowed, the economy having matured, Taiwan has been doing well economically, even through the Asian economic meltdown, and remains a model for other coun­ tries. Its economic success also gives Taiwan prestige and, in the context of a new world order wherein economic power is more important, influence in global politics.


The Economy to 1950

Centuries ago, although Taiwan's economy was generally in a primitive state of development, the Aborigines engaged in some commerce with other areas in the region. However, by the 1500s, this trading had all but disappeared, and, at the time of the immigration of Chinese to the island, the economic activities of the Aborigines included hunting, fishing, berry picking, and some farming. The mountain Aborigines mainly engaged in the former three pursuits; the lowland Aborigines cultivated some of the level land on the island. The island was subse-

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Taiwan: Nation-State or Province?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Photographs ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1- The Land And The People 1
  • Notes 18
  • 2- History 21
  • Notes 48
  • 3- Society and Culture 53
  • Notes 86
  • 4- Political System 91
  • Notes 123
  • 5- The Economy 127
  • Notes 153
  • 6- Foreign And Military Policies 157
  • Notes 187
  • 7- The Future 191
  • Selected Bibliography 211
  • Index 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.