Latin American Civilization: History and Society, 1492 to the Present

By Benjamin Keen | Go to book overview

18
ARGENTINA: THE STRUGGLE FOR DEMOCRACY5, 1890-1994

A FLOOD OF European immigrants and capital transformed the face of Argentina in the last decades of the nineteenth century. Cattle raising and agriculture made great progress, and a flourishing middle class, largely of immigrant origins, arose in Buenos Aires and other urban areas. In 1916 the long struggle of the middle class and its allies, organized in the Radical party, to win free elections and a share of political power succeeded when Hipólito Yrigoyen was elected president. But whether Radicals or Conservatives ruled, agrarian interests continued to dominate Argentine life; they were virtually unchallenged until 1930, when the Great Depression sharply reduced exports and imports and promoted a rapid growth of domestic industry.

The outbreak of World War II caused tension between pro-Allied groups and a nationalist military who held England and the United States responsible for Argentina's neocolonial status and wished to keep Argentina neutral in the great conflict. On the eve of the election of 1943 an army revolt, engineered by a powerful secret military lodge, brought to power a government dominated by ultranationalistic militarists.

A young army colonel, Juan Domingo Perón (elected president of Argentina in 1946, reelected in 1952), soon rose to leadership of the nationalist movement. His program, combining industrialization with a paternalistic effort to improve the condition of the working class, was expressed in the doctrine of justicialismo, which preached national unity and rejected class struggle. Despite his radical antioligarchical, anti-imperialist rhetoric, Perón made no serious effort to challenge the latifundio, a major cause of Argentine rural backwardness, or to restrict foreign investment in Argentine industry. In the postwar period declining demand and prices for Argentine exports

-338-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Latin American Civilization: History and Society, 1492 to the Present
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 507

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.