Making a Voice: African Resistance to Segregation in South Africa

By Joyce F. Kirk | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

My first acknowledgement must go to my Mom for instilling in me the belief that I could accomplish my goals and insisting that education was the key to success. Next, I must thank my family, brothers, sisters, nieces, and nephews for being supportive through all the years it has taken me to complete this book. I must also thank the following: undergraduate teachers, Cathern Davis, and Erlie Burton at Malcolm X College, Chicago, Illinois. Sterling Plumpp, University of Illinois--Chicago Circle, for inspiring me with African literature and talk of the Limpopo river that germinated a burning desire to study African history and do research in South Africa. In graduate school the friendship of my sisters in spirit, Keletso Atkins, Lynda Day, Susan Grabler, Rene Tantala and Hazel Symonette and brothers in spirit, David Anthony, Jim Giblin, David Newbury, Jacob Mohlamme, and Mbudzeni Sibara. And other supportive friends: Carolyn McVeigh, Cheryl Johnson, Carline Edie, Helen May, Blandina Giblin, Fabu Carter, Donna Jones, Robert Dale, Robert Baum, Robert Rinfrow, Vincent Smith, Kweku Embil, members of the Zito Dance Troupe, and many others.

The three American professors that influenced me most were Steven Feierman, Jan Vansina, and Tom Shick (passed on). I thank you. The six months I stayed at Jan's house saved me financially and helped me to complete a considerable amount of microform reading. Steven Feierman exhibited great patience and fortitude in sending me taped comments to make corrections on the dissertation and being available exactly when I needed him most.

I want to thank Patrick Harries and Christopher Saunders for their hospitality each time I was in Cape Town, and Helen Bradford in both Johannesburg and Cape Town. Thanks to Gary Baines for helpful correspondence and deeds over the years. A special thanks and appreciation to my South African sister in spirit, Lindiwe Mzo, and also to Nenzi Plaatjes, Magala Ngatane, Poppy Huna, Puci Headbush, Teboho Moja, and Zola Vakalisa. And to my South African brothers in spirit Jeff Peires, Zweklakhe Tshandu, Trevor Mdaka and family, Moses Molapo (passed on), Wilmot James, Motepele Malebana, Ivan Evans, Nenzi and all the families in the eastern Cape, in particular, members of the Headbush fam-

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