The Kingfish and the Constitution: Huey Long, the First Amendment, and the Emergence of Modern Press Freedom in America

By Richard C. Cortner | Go to book overview

was the principal legal adviser to General Mark Clark, who commanded the military administration of Austria. Returning to civilian life, Deutsch served as a special assistant to the U.S. attorney general, defending damage claims against the government arising from a disastrous explosion of fertilizer with an ammonium nitrate base at Texas City, Texas, on April 16 and 17, 1947--at the time the largest civil litigation in the world. He was subsequently given the highest civilian award the secretary of the army could bestow, the Distinguished Civilian Service Award, which commended his "superior initiative, outstanding leadership, and many accomplishments which reflect great credit to him and the military services." Deutsch was also active in the American Bar Association, serving on its standing committee on admiralty and maritime law and as chair of the American Bar Association's standing committee on peace and law through the United Nations. Eberhard Paul Deutsch died at the age of eighty-two in New Orleans on January 16, 1980. In addition to his outstanding service to his country during World War II, he also left a lasting legacy as the architect of a landmark advance in American civil liberties in Grosjean v. American Press Co.27


NOTES
1.
Brozvii v. Mississippi, 297 U.S. 278 ( 1936); see also Richard C. Cortner, A "Scottsboro" Case in Mississippi: The Supreme Court and Brown v. Mississippi ( Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1986); U.S. v. Butler, 297 U.S. 1 ( 1936); Carter v. Carter Coal Co., 298 U.S. 238 ( 1936); Ashwander v. TVA, 297 U.S. 288 ( 1936); Morehead v. New York, 298 U.S. 587 ( 1936); Alpheus T. Mason, Harlan Fiske Stone ( New York: Viking, 1956), pp. 425-26; George S. Hellman, Benjamin N. Cardozo: American Judge ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1940), p. 231.
2.
Joseph Alsop and Turner Catledge, The 168 Days ( Garden City, N.J.: Doubleday, 1938); Leonard Baker, Back to Back: The Duel between FDR and the Supreme Court ( New York: Macmillan, 1967).
3.
West Coast Hotel Co. v. Parrish, 300 U.S. 379 ( 1937).
4.
Richard C. Cortner, The Wagner Act Cases ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1964), pp. 78, 84.
5.
Editor & Publisher 69 ( Oct. 10, 1936): 7, 49; 69 ( Oct. 17, 1936): 9; 69 ( Dec. 12, 1936): 13; Cortner, The Wagner Act Cases, p. 97.
6.
Brief for the Associated Press, Associated Press v. NLRB, 301 U.S. 103 ( 1937), pp. 99-102; Cortner, The Wagner Act Cases, p. 160.
7.
Brief for the American Newspaper Publishers' Association as Amicus Curiae, Associated Press v. NLRB, 301 U.S. 103 ( 1937), pp. 8-9, 12; Cortner, The Wagner Act Cases, p. 160.
8.
NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp., 301 U.S. 1 ( 1937); Associated Press v. NLRB, 301 U.S. 103, 132-33 ( 1937). The remaining cases in which the NLRA was upheld by the Court were NLRB v. Fruehauf Trailer Co., 301 U.S. 49 ( 1937); NLRB v. Friedman-Harry Marks Clothing Co., 301 U.S. 58 ( 1937); and Washington, Virginia and Maryland Coach Co. v. NLRB, 301 U.S. 142 ( 1937).

-185-

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The Kingfish and the Constitution: Huey Long, the First Amendment, and the Emergence of Modern Press Freedom in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Political Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Notes xiv
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction: Huey Long, the Press, and the First Amendment in 1930 1
  • Notes 16
  • Chapter 2 - The Kingfish and the "Lying Newspapers" of Louisiana 19
  • Notes 44
  • Chapter 3 - The Kingfish Goes National 47
  • Notes 64
  • Chapter 4 - Guiding the Newspapers in the "Path of Rectitude": Censorship by Taxation 67
  • Notes 92
  • Chapter 5 - The Press Counterattacks 95
  • Notes 116
  • Chapter 6 - The Grosjean Case before the Three-Judge Court 119
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter 7 - The Appeal to the Supreme Court 149
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter 8 - Epilogue 175
  • Notes 185
  • Bibliographical Essay 187
  • Index 191
  • About the Author 197
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