The Press and the Modern Presidency: Myths and Mindsets from Kennedy to Clinton

By Louis W. Liebovich | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWELVE
THE 1994 AND 1996 ELECTIONS

During the last quarter of the twentieth century, the nation drifted to the right politically. The liberal editorial policies of the nation's most influential newspapers--The New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Los Angeles Times-- fell out of step with the attitudes of most Americans and this led to complaints about the "liberal press." Resentment against political coverage generally heightened. Americans in the 1990s wanted fewer government rules and restrictions and a legislative agenda friendly to middle-class wage earners and to middle-of-the road values. They also wanted media whose editorial arguments fit with that perspective. Many smaller and medium-sized newspapers stopped issuing political endorsements. Bill Clinton adroitly gauged this drift and separated himself from both the perceived liberal media and liberal issues.

The conservative atmosphere can be attributed to a complex combination of historical and socioeconomic trends that led to a restructuring of the political balance of power in Washington. The social safety net assembled in the affluent 1960s seemed burdensome in the parsimonious years of heavy budget deficits and declining U.S. world economic hegemony. Under the Clinton administration's proposed 1998 federal budget, 56 percent was pigeonholed for entitlement programs. The most expensive--social security, Medicaid, and Medicare--would cost forty cents of every federal tax dollar. Only 15 percent would be spent on defense and 15 percent, a quarter of a trillion dollars, on just the cost of paying interest on the national debt. Seventy-one percent of the proposed budget was earmarked for spending on social services or interest on debt.

-195-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Press and the Modern Presidency: Myths and Mindsets from Kennedy to Clinton
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 237

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.