Creating Caring and Nurturing Educational Environments for African American Children

By Curtis L. Morris; Vivian Gunn Morris | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
Significant Dates and Events Related to African American Education in Tuscumbia, Alabama
1815White settlers arrived in the area now known as Tuscumbia. The land was sold
to Michael Dixon by Chickasaw Chief Tuscumbia for a reported five dollars
and two pole axes.
1817 Tuscumbia was the first city chartered in northwest Alabama, once known as
Big Spring, Alabama.
1819 Alabama became a state.
1820 Tuscumbia was incorporated.
1824 Tuscumbia's first newspaper, the Franklin Enquirer, was published on March
13, 1824. The name was changed to the Tuscumbian on August 25, 1924.
1832The Alabama legislature passed a law making it a crime to instruct an African
American, free or slave, in the arts of reading and writing. A fine of $250 to
$500 was imposed on persons guilty of this offense.
1856 Alabama state legislature passed a law called "To Prohibit the Teaching of
Slaves to Read and Write." Offenders would be fined a minimum of $100
and/or three months in jail.
1861The Civil War began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate forces opened fire
on Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. One of the chief
causes of the war was the issue of slavery of African Americans.
The American Missionary Association was the first of many aid societies to re-
spond with aid for freed slaves in 1861.
1863The Emancipation Proclamation decree granting freedom from slavery was
issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863.

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