Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763

By William R. Nester | Go to book overview

6
Subjection "To Be a Vassal to His Low Commanders"

What universal cries of joy and what bumpers of Madiera are drunk to his prompt departure.

-- Captain Simeon Ecuyer on Sir Jeffrey Amherst's return to England

Is not Gage to be pitied? The war will be a tedious one, even though attended with success. Instead of decisive battles, woodland skirmishes; instead of colors and cannon, our trophies will be stinking scalps. Heaven preserve you, my friend, from a war conducted in a spirit of murder.

-- William Smith to Thomas Gage

They would rather die with their tomahawks in their hands than live in slavery. . . . Be persuaded that we will not finish the war with the English whilst there remains one of us red men.

-- Pontiac to Pierre Joseph Neyon de Villiers

Who was this new commander who so deserved to be "pitied"?1 Although his exact birth date is unknown, Thomas Gage was about 44 when he replaced Amherst. He would remain His Majesty's Commander in Chief for North America from 1763 until 1775. The man who commanded British forces during that twelve years of worsening strife, which exploded with the Battle of Lexington and Concord, not only genuinely liked Americans and life in the New World but married Margaret Kemble, a beautiful young woman from New Jersey.

His recall for failure to crush the revolution in 1775 would be an unfortunate end to a proficient though hardly illustrious military career. His father may have bought him an ensign's commission as early as 1736 but definitely

-185-

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Haughty Conquerors: Amherst and the Great Indian Uprising of 1763
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Notes xiii
  • 1 - Conquest "Where Are We Now? The French Are All Subdued" 1
  • Notes 31
  • 2 - Conspiracies "Destroy Their Forts and Make Them Rue the Day" 35
  • Notes 66
  • 3 - Attacks "And Drive These Britons Hence Like Frightened Deer" 73
  • Notes 103
  • 4 - Counterattacks "Big with Their Victories" 107
  • Notes 145
  • 5 - Stalemate "Leave These Distant Lakes and Streams to Us" 149
  • Notes 179
  • 6 - Subjection "To Be a Vassal to His Low Commanders" 185
  • Notes 223
  • 7 - Settlements "Nay Think Us Conquered, and Our Country Theirs" 231
  • Notes 269
  • 8 - Consequencesl "Whom See We Now, Their Haughty Conquerors" 279
  • Notes 283
  • Index 285
  • About the Author *
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