Preface

This text is not written as most texts. It is written, intentionally, with unfilled spaces: with ideas raised, with arguments suggested, with problems noted but without elaboration. Spaces may be filled with additional readings, lectures, and/or class discussion and debate. I have done this to allow teachers to adapt it to their own styles of teaching. Far too often, texts provide too much information, making sure that every question is answered. While perhaps comforting on some levels, this approach seems uninspiring, less conducive to learning, and unchallenging to teaching. Such an approach leaves nothing for professor or students to grapple with, either individually or collectively.

It does seem necessary to explain this book further, by saying what it is and is not. It was intended to be comprehensive in scope, but not exhaustive in content. Thus, do not expect to find all relevant case work cited here, all issues covered completely, all questions fully explained, etc.

This is an introductory, undergraduate text. The job of such a book is multiple: to inform at an initial level, to open new doors a little way, and to open old doors more widely. It is to pique curiosity and stimulate continued study at more advanced levels. The book's aim is to offer possibilities.

A number of people helped make this book a possibility for me, and to them and those whom I may inadvertently slight in the following list, I give my heartfelt thanks. First, to Patty Coleman for suggesting that I write this book. There is no doubt that if she had not planted the seed and then prodded thereafter, there would be no book today. Second, to La Salle University for granting me a semester leave to work on the book. Thanks to the birth of my son, the leave was not used as productively as it could

-ix-

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