Electronic Magazines: Soft News Programs on Network Television

By William C. Spragens | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
"Street Stories" Program Content in 1992 and 1993

By 1993 the Street Stories series, moderated by Ed Bradley on CBS and begun several years earlier, was one of a welter of magazine programs which included CBS' 60 Minutes as well as 48 Hours ( CBS), 20/20 and PrimeTime Live ( ABC), Dateline NBC and two 1993 newcomers, Now with Tom and Katie ( NBC) and Day One with Forrest Sawyer ( ABC), in addition to another recent addition, the Fox network's Front Page."

Also on CNN there were such programs as Crossfire," a debate show, and Closeup," which may not be true magazine shows but are not quite straight news either. This listing excludes Nightline on ABC and the so-called tabloid shows. This variety indicates that the public had a much more voracious appetite for this type of programming in 1993 than it did when the genre began in the 1960s.

This continuing analysis deals with Street Stories aired late in 1992 and early in 1993, looking at those segments with political content.

The November 5, 1992, Street Stories began with a Bradley segment in which he was joined by Peter Van Sant interviewing individuals about their dealings with health maintenance organizations ( HMOs). The timeliness of this was apparent since the health care crisis was reflected in numerous 60 Minutes segments in the period previously analyzed. Bradley noted that Peter Van Sant's segment "tells us, because of the way that some HMOs are set up, some doctors may be making a fateful choice between saving lives

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