The United Nations and the Maintenance of International Security: A Challenge to Be Met

By James S. Sutterlin | Go to book overview

incapable of maintaining the cease-fire in Mogadishu. For this purpose enforcement measures were also needed.

From these two experiences the conclusion that emerges is that peace- enforcement is a much needed addition to the tools available to the United Nations in seeking to end internal conflict. It also emerges that the United Nations and member states have much to learn, and many adjustments to make, in applying the concept in the future. Some progress has already been made. A state-of-the-art operations center has been established at UN Headquarters through which constant communication with field operations is now possible. The importance of pursuing a political track simultaneously with peace-enforcement measures is now better understood, as is the need for fuller background information on the historical, social and political circumstances in deciding whether peacekeeping or peace-enforcement is the right course to follow.

Command and control will remain a complex problem in multilateral enforcement actions. In the light of the Somali and Yugoslav experiences, it appears desirable to remove the Secretary-General from operational responsibility when enforcement measures are to be taken. To be of assistance in the ultimate resolution of the conflict--that is, in peacemaking--the Secretary-General needs to remain above the fray. His impartiality will be in jeopardy if he is the one ultimately responsible for the decision to bomb one party or another. This is a task better assumed by the Security Council or an organization acting in its behalf.

To ensure greater success for future enforcement actions one responsibility lies mainly with governments. It will be extremely important that member states comply with the Secretary-General's recommendation that they earmark and train specified troop units (preferably of volunteers) for enforcement-type duties. It will also be important for countries with extensive military resources, especially those like the United States that have indicated they do not intend to earmark specific units for UN duty, to keep in readiness the equipment that would be needed for peace-enforcement actions. It would be a useful function of the long-idle Military Staff Committee to draw up an inventory of materiel for which a need can be foreseen and work out with member states what each can best supply.


NOTES
1.
Security Council Resolution S/1511, 27 June 1950.
2.
SCOR 2d Year, Special supplement No. 1, S/336, 30 April 1947.
3.
Security Council Resolution S/1588, 7 July 1950.
4.
Security Council Resolution 665, 25 August 1990.
5.
Presidential Decision Directive 25, 3 May 1994.

-67-

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The United Nations and the Maintenance of International Security: A Challenge to Be Met
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • 1 - Old Principles, New Realities 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Preventing Conflict 11
  • Notes 24
  • 3 - Military Force in the Service of Peace: Peacekeeping in Intrastate Conflict 25
  • Notes 45
  • 4 - Repelling Aggression and Enforcing Peace 47
  • Notes 67
  • 5 - Building Peace 71
  • Notes 85
  • 6 - Enhancing Nuclear Security in a Multipolar World 87
  • Notes 92
  • 7 - The Potential of Regional Organizations 93
  • Notes 111
  • 8 - The Secretary-General as Chief Administrative Officer of a United Nations Under Challenge 113
  • Notes 131
  • 9 - The Challenge for Governments and Peoples 133
  • Notes 139
  • Selected Bibliography 141
  • Index 143
  • About the Author 147
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