First Steps toward Economic Independence: New States of the Postcommunist World

By Michael L. Wyzan | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The joint project for the construction of the dam was based on a bilateral intergovernment treaty from 1977, which at present Hungary refuses to recognize. The two countries have agreed to submit the dispute to the International Court of Justice in the Hague.
2.
Slovakia has assumed all relevant contractual obligations of the former Czechoslovakia.
3.
However, the possibility is allowed for that they may be modified in a peaceful manner.
4.
In many districts with a high proportion of Hungarians, there is a considerable degree of entrepreneurial activity supported by an inflow of capital from Hungary. This may become an important dynamizing factor in the near future.
5.
This would mean that more than half of the woodlands and a great part of the agricultural land would become the property of ethnic Hungarians.
6.
A low level of ethnic self-consciousness and self-identification problems that cause Gypsies to consider themselves members of other minorities are among the main reasons for the differences in the statistics.
7.
Amendment of the language law is urgently needed, so as to settle the issue of the use of first and family names written in the minority's own language. The same applies to the question of the inscription of place names in both languages.
8.
The Law on the Division of the Property of the former CSFR between the Czech Republic and the Slovak Republic was enacted on November 13, 1992.
9.
The Czech government had argued that since more shares of the Czech enterprises were sold in Slovakia than vice versa, compensation of 19 billion Czech koruna should be paid to the Czech government by the Slovak government. Reaction from abroad forced the Czech government to change its mind.
10.
In June 1992, the hard currency reserves of the CSFR came to $4.89 billion. In the course of the second half of 1992, Czech commercial banks bought up a considerable part of these reserves. At the same time, Czech imports increased considerably. The Czech trade deficit that year reached 22.6 billion CSK, while the equivalent figure for Slovakia was only 2.1 billion CSK.
11.
This difference is flexible. During the period from February to April 1993, the NBS made use of the entire corridor and devalued the Slovak koruna by ten percent relative to the Czech currency unit. The Czech national bank revalued at the same time in such way that the difference between Slovak koruna and Czech koruna came to 7 percent. After Slovakia had by the late fall run up a clearing deficit with the Czech Republic that threatened to exceed the limit of 130 million ecu, the Slovak koruna was devalued by a further 8 percent relative to the ecu on December 7 ( Cook, 1994).
12.
Internal convertibility gives enterprises and organizations the right to buy foreign currencies in commercial banks at the official exchange rate for financing imports. At the same time these actors are obligated to offer foreign currency acquired via exports at the same official exchange rate to the commercial banks. Every citizen over 15 years of age may buy a limited amount of foreign currency at a commercial bank (in 1993 this amounted to 7,000 SK).
13.
In the first quarter of the year, revenue represented 16 percent (25 billion SK), and expenditures 23 percent (36 billion SK), of the annual budget. The highest degree

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
First Steps toward Economic Independence: New States of the Postcommunist World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1- Introduction 1
  • References 21
  • I- FORMER SOVIET REPUBLICS 23
  • 2- Estonia 25
  • CONCLUSIONS 43
  • Notes 45
  • Notes 48
  • 3- Ukraine 50
  • Conclusion 75
  • References 77
  • 4- Kazakhstan 80
  • 4- Kazakhstan 80
  • Notes 107
  • Notes 107
  • 5- Georgia 112
  • Notes 134
  • II- FORMER YUGOSLAV REPUBLICS 137
  • CONCLUSIONS 161
  • Notes 162
  • Notes 163
  • 7- Croatia 166
  • Conclusion 185
  • Notes 186
  • Notes 191
  • 8- Macedonia 193
  • Notes 219
  • Notes 221
  • III- OTHER CASES 227
  • 9- Slovakia 229
  • Notes 255
  • Index 259
  • About the Editor and Contributors 267
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 270

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.