American Women Managers and Administrators: A Selective Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Leaders in Business, Education, and Government

By Judith A. Leavitt | Go to book overview

W

WACHNER, LINDA JOY ( February 3, 1946-- ). President and Chief Operating Officer, Max Factor & Co., 1982-- President, U.S. Division, Max Factor & Co., 1979-82.

Born February 3, 1946, in New York City to Herman and Shirley Wachner, Linda Wachner received a B.S. degree in economics and business in 1966 from the University of Buffalo. She later studied at the Bernard M. Baruch College of the City University of New York.

From 1968-69, Wachner worked for Foley's Federated Department Store in Houston, Texas, as a buyer. Only 21 years old, she was the youngest buyer at Foley's. After leaving Foley's, Wachner worked for five years ( 1969-74) as a senior buyer for R.H. Macy's in New York.

In 1974 Wachner joined the Warner Division of Wamaco and became the first female vice-president in Warner's history. She left Warnaco in 1977 to serve as vice-president of marketing for Caron International, a large needlecraft and yarn manufacturer.

In 1979 Wachner was named president of the U.S. division of Max Factor & Co., a major cosmetics firm. As president, Wachner expanded Max Factor and Maxi cosmetics distribution to supermarkets and drug stores, increasing sales for the division. Since 1981 she has also served as president of Missoni Profumi S.P.A., a Max Factor affiliate, and in 1982, at the age of 36, Wachner was named president and chief operating office of Max Factor.

In 1980 the Women's Equity Action League named Wachner the Outstanding Woman in Business. Wachner married Seymour Appelbaum in 1973.

In a 1981 Working Woman article Wachner discussed working women and power.

I think there'll continue to be more working women, more double income households, a need for different kinds of products and more visible points of purchase. . . . I don't think recession and inflation will take women out of the work force . . . Power is the ability to get the results accomplished. It's self power. It doesn't come with the initials after your title.


Bibliography--About

Horowitz Bruce. "50 Rising Starts for the Future." Industry Week ( February 21, 1983): 48-60.

Wood Marcia Donnan, and Candela Christine. "A View from the Top." Working Woman 6 ( March 1981): 40-41, 116.

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American Women Managers and Administrators: A Selective Biographical Dictionary of Twentieth-Century Leaders in Business, Education, and Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xiv
  • Abbreviations xv
  • A 3
  • B 17
  • C 41
  • D 63
  • E 69
  • F 71
  • G 81
  • H 99
  • I 125
  • J 127
  • K 131
  • L 153
  • M 167
  • N 191
  • O 197
  • P 201
  • R 221
  • S 241
  • T 265
  • V 275
  • W 279
  • Y 297
  • Appendix 299
  • General Bibliography 307
  • Index 313
  • About the Author 319
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