Persuasive Encounters: Case Studies in Constructive Confrontation

By Gary C. Woodward | Go to book overview

Morley Safer became instrumental in dramatizing the horrific effects of guerrilla warfare. By then, television was making extensive use of film footage that was shipped out of the war zones and relayed back to New York in time for the evening newscasts. If it was never easy to achieve, "shooting bloody" in Vietnam became a form of spot news that lent itself to television and began to change attitudes toward the war. Americans were shocked but also fascinated by graphic footage of dramatic helicopter rescues, maimed soldiers, and the corpses of American and Vietnamese boys concealed in lush green fields. Television was much better at showing the costly effects of a policy than explaining the rationales of those who shaped it. Tragically, the vivid combat coverage was rarely matched by vigorous public discussion of Vietnam policy until after the Tet Offensive in 1968. By then the nightly portrayals of death and futility had had their effect, but too late to save the 20,000 Americans who had been killed in action. Few of those early casualties probably ever saw an extended television discussion about the wisdom of waging a land war in Southeast Asia.

If Murrow did not achieve what he ideally wanted -- to alter the American agenda through the medium of television -- he at least raised the right questions to the right audience. He suppressed whatever doubts he might have had about the capacity of the general public to watch news programming, focusing instead on the misplaced priorities of broadcast executives. The immediate audience in Chicago surely liked what he had to say; most of them saw Murrow as a prestigious ally. As an advocate of programming devoted to serious public discussion, he laid out a statement of principles that others could later use in their own feuds with the television "money machine." When considered from the perspective of the general public, this persuasive encounter is most memorable as a courageous reminder that television's enormous profits and large audiences carry certain obligations. Along with a similar message delivered by a Federal Communications Commission ( FCC) commissioner three years later,36 Murrow's effort surely helped heighten expectations about the "public trustee" role of television news. It was probably an added bonus that he made some of the industry's leaders slightly uncomfortable with their success. "I've always been on the side of the heretics," he explained to a friend after the speech, "because the heretics so often proved to be right."37


NOTES
1
Edward R. Murrow, "A Reporter Talks to His Colleagues", The Reporter, November 13, 1958, p. 32.
2
"This Is Murrow", Time, September 30, 1957, p. 48.
3
Quoted in Fred W. Friendly, Due to Circumstances beyond Our Control ( New York: Vintage, 1967), p, xvi.
6
John Lardner, "The Air", The New Yorker, November 4, 1959, p. 234.

-96-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Persuasive Encounters: Case Studies in Constructive Confrontation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Preface xi
  • Title Page *
  • 1 - The Politics of Confrontation: From John Lennon to Wendell Phillips 1
  • Notes 23
  • 2 - Persuasive Encounters: A Theoretical Overview 27
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - Edward Kennedy: Behind Enemy Lines 53
  • Notes 75
  • 4 - "This Just Might Do Nobody Any Good": Edward R. Murrow and the News Directors 77
  • Notes 96
  • 5 - The Theater of Conflict: "Donahue" in Russia 99
  • Notes 129
  • 6 - Thomas Szasz and the War against Coercive Psychiatry 133
  • Notes 159
  • 7 - "How Am I Doing?": Gorilla Politics in the Town Meetings of Ed Koch 163
  • Notes 185
  • Selected Bibliography 189
  • Index 193
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 198

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.