Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama

By Femi Euba | Go to book overview

3
Victims of Satire

In terms of Esu-Elegbara, then, the most important factor of satire is hardly the satirist but the satirized--the victim of satire. This seems to be consistent with an observation made in the introduction--that it is not so much the "problematic" of Esu that is significant as that of his devotees. And since these devotees are after all Esu's people (specifically, every black person in Esu's black tradition, although in general mankind as a whole), his victims, that is, victims of satire, must necessarily be located first and foremost in the black tradition. As has been noted, these victims will constitute the potential characters of the satirist-dramatist, whose theme and action will express the concept of what I have called the Drama of Epidemic. I hope to emphasize, in the light of Esu as the archetype of satire and satirist, that these characters are bound up with the ritual and archetypal role, and in the disposition of the satirist. Also, by relating to the fateful and fatal manifestations of satire, the victim may be seen as an agent of his or her own satiric action or destruction. The implication here is related to what Peter Morton-Williams observes as a traditional fact, that Esu cannot lead an individual into misfortune unless the individual provokes the event.1 With Esu, as Hendrickson argues in the case of Archilochus, the victims are agents of their own satiric destruction.2

Because it deals with two general localities, this chapter falls into two sections. The first considers the victims in the Yoruba (Nigerian) locality from where Esu originates. The second section extends the black milieu to the Americas, mainly by virtue of the presence of Yoruba descendants in the locality and, more important, by the obvious influences of the Yoruba religion.3 But the assertion that the victims in these localities are representatives of the black tradition must be taken in broad terms, since little or no attempt is made to identify specific characteristics of Esu in each of the black cultures. As we

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Archetypes, Imprecators, and Victims of Fate: Origins and Developments of Satire in Black Drama
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 12
  • I - ORIGINS 15
  • 1 - Concepts of Fate 17
  • 2 - Archetypes: Satire and Satirist 45
  • II - DEVELOPMENTS 69
  • 3 - Victims of Satire 71
  • 4 - Drama of Epidemic 121
  • Conclusion 163
  • Appendix: List of Informants 165
  • Glossary: Yoruba Tones in Words, Phrases, and Sentences 167
  • Selected Bibliography 173
  • Index 191
  • About the Author 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.