Advocacy Groups and the Entertainment Industry

By Michael Suman; Gabriel Rossman | Go to book overview

11
What Is an Advocacy Group, Anyway?

Thomas Streeter

The phenomenon of "advocacy groups" means different things to different people. To activists, advocacy groups are a part of political organizing, useful and perhaps necessary for protecting the rights of a minority group or marginalized interest against the entrenched powers of giant media corporations. To executives, the groups are perhaps annoying, but in any case an inevitable part of the complex terrain of the media business. To lawyers and policy experts, the groups raise all kinds of interesting procedural and technical issues about the appropriate boundaries between rights and responsibilities of stakeholders in this complicated area.

This chapter looks not at the differences among these perspectives, but at what they all share: the set of underlying assumptions from which the existence of such groups makes sense in the first place. What do we mean when we say "advocacy group"? How has it come to be the case that advocacy groups seem "practical," "inevitable," a part of the legal landscape? The answer is in part historical: collectively advocacy groups compose an institution that is peculiar to our time and can be explained in terms of the history of the relationship between business and government in the twentieth century. And the answer is also in part theoretical: advocacy groups, this chapter will argue, embody a particular theory or vision of politics and democracy. The chapter concludes that they are an important but circumscribed vehicle for democratic political action in the media field.


HOW SHOULD WE ORGANIZE CREATIVITY? THE STRUGGLE OVER GOVERNMENT/BUSINESS RELATIONS IN THE 20TH CENTURY

The romantic tale of the isolated artist writing the Great American Novel in a freezing garret, as popular as it is, has little to do with creativity in mass media today. Individual variations in experience, talent, and effort are of course crucial,

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advocacy Groups and the Entertainment Industry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 177

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.