Advocacy Groups and the Entertainment Industry

By Michael Suman; Gabriel Rossman | Go to book overview

A Millenarian View of Artists and Audiences
Nicholas JohnsonThis collection of essays offers the reader a wide-ranging discussion of the possible, and the appropriate, involvement of the audience in shaping the content of entertainment and journalism. It is a fitting and useful update to Kathryn C. Montgomery seminal work, Target: Prime Time: Advocacy Groups and the Struggle over Entertainment Television.1 Many essays, such as Michael Suman Interest Groups and Public Debate," contain a rich source of data and anecdote about individual advocacy groups and their activities. Together they represent a variety of opinions as well.At one extreme there are the activists and moralists who seek to prevent, or at least minimize, what they see as the antisocial and immoral consequences of the media.
Ted Baehr piece, How Church Advocacy Groups Fostered the Golden Age of Hollywood," and William Donohue A Catholic Look at the Entertainment Industry provide us a history of the role of organized religion in this cause.
Guy Aoki ( Strategies of the Media Action Network for Asian Americans) explains the need for, and tactics of, media advocacy from a racial, or ethnic, perspective.
At the other end of the spectrum is an uneasy coalition from the worlds of commerce and the arts that desires, often for inconsistent reasons, to preserve its "freedom" to create--and to maximize profit.
Carol Altieri ( Advocacy Groups Confront CBS: Problems or Opportunities?) offers a view from CBS's program practices department, as Al Schneider does in his revealing and useful history from inside ABC ( Dealing with Advocacy Groups at ABC).
Mickey Gardner's call to arms against advocacy ( Public Policy Advocacy: Truant Independent Producers in a Federal City Fixated on a 'Values Agenda') carefully details, and candidly expresses, his frustration with any interference in the creative

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