Advocacy Groups and the Entertainment Industry

By Michael Suman; Gabriel Rossman | Go to book overview

Selected Bibliography

Baehr Ted. The Media-Wise Family. Colorado Springs, Colo.: Chariot Victor, 1998.

Bagdikian Ken H. The Media Monopoly. Boston: Beacon Press, 1992.

Barnouw Eric. A Tower in Babel: A History of Broadcasting in the United States to 1933. New York: Oxford, 1966.

Caplow Theodore. American Social Trends. Orlando, Fla.: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1991.

Choper Jesse H. Consequences of Supreme Court Decisions Upholding Individual Constitutional Rights, 83 Michigan Law Review 1, 58 & n. 371, 1984.

Classen Steven Douglas. "Southern Discomforts: The Racial Struggle Over Popular Television", in Lynn Spigel and Michael Curtin, eds. The Revolution Wasn't Televised: Sixties Television and Social Conflict. New York: Rouledge, 1997.

-----. "Standing on Unstable Grounds: A Reexamination of the WLBT-TV Case", in Critical Studies in Mass Communication 11, Spring 1994.

-----. Watching Jim Crow: The Struggles Over Mississippi Television, 1955-1969. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, forthcoming.

Cohen Bernard. The Press and Foreign Policy. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1963.

Curtin Michael. "Connections and Differences: The Spatial Dimension of Television History", in Film and History, in press.

-----. "On Edge: Culture Industries in the Neo-Network Era", in Richard Ohmann, Gage Averill, Michael Curtin, David Shumway, and Elizabeth G. Traube, eds. Making and Selling Culture. Hanover, N.H.: University Press of New England, 1997.

Davis James A. General Social Survey Codebook. Chicago, IL: National Opinion Research Center, 1994.

Department of California Highway Patrol. "A compendium for the implementation of the designated driver program". Sacramento, Calif: Office of Public Affairs, 1992.

Donohue William. "Executive Summary", in Catholic League's 1997 Report on Anti- Catholicism. http://www.catholicleague.org/report97.htm.

Epstein Edward J. News from Nowhere: Television and the News. New York: Vintage

-159-

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