Sino-Latin American Economic Relations

By He Li | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

Sino-Latin American relations date back to ancient times. Historical records suggest that the Chinese and Indians are cognate races, sharing a common origin long before the discovery of the Americas1 Historically, trade relations between China and Latin America have been weak and sporadic. Except for the period of the Manila Galleon trade,2 the movement of people from China to Latin America far outweighed the importance of the shipment of goods. In contrast, well-established trade relations between Latin America and the West date to the colonial period.

With the formation of the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1949, trade relations between China3 and Latin America were further constrained by complex ideological and political factors. During the preCuban Revolution period, Beijing (Peking) had neither the opportunity nor the incentive for involvement in Latin America. Only in 1960 did China establish diplomatic relations with Cuba, the first such PRC connection with Latin America. Ten years later, Chile under Salvador Allende became the second Latin American state to establish diplomatic ties with China. After the PRC's entry into the United Nations (UN) in late 1971, Chinese diplomatic representation in Latin America increased, and by 1978 China had embassies in twelve Latin American countries. This paralleled the growth of Chinese economic activities in Latin America. Until the Chinese "open-door policy" in 1978, however, the political and economic ties between the two regions were very limited.

Since the late 1970s, Sino-Latin American economic relations have undergone a radical change. Economic interactions have intensified; and financial, commercial, investment, and technical ties have been established

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Sino-Latin American Economic Relations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tables and Figures vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • 2 - Early Development of Sino-Latin American Economic Relations: 1949-1958 10
  • Notes 17
  • 3 - The Years after the Cuban Revolution: 1959-1969 20
  • Notes 32
  • 4 - The Period of Normalization of Relations: 1970-1977 34
  • Notes 49
  • 5 - China's Open-Door Policy and Trade with Latin America: 1978-1990 53
  • Notes 74
  • Notes 87
  • 7 - Technology Transfer 89
  • Notes 95
  • 8 - Problems and Issues in Current Economic Relations 97
  • Notes 109
  • 9 - Prospects for Future Economic Relations 111
  • Notes 127
  • 10 - Summary and Conclusions 130
  • Notes 146
  • Appendix A: Trade Treaties and Agreements between China and Latin America, 1949-1990 151
  • Appendix B: Major Sino-Latin American Joint Ventures in Latin America 159
  • Selected Bibliography 161
  • Index 171
  • About the Author 179
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