Invisible Victims: White Males and the Crisis of Affirmative Action

By Frederick R. Lynch | Go to book overview

reliances on preliminary and conditioned exploratory discussions, totally ordinary and customary to the appointment processes in academic institutions, was conjectural on your part. Your reliances based on the record of the circumstances as we have them were your own acts and not reasonably binding upon the University. On advice of counsel, we are prepared to support and defend our position should you choose to take action.

We understand the following summary to recite our record.

Your application for a faculty appointment in our School of Business Administration was unsolicited by us. Dean CB . . . . found your credentials impressive and you were invited to visit the campus in late March for an interview. You executed a formal application on March 3, 1972, and you were interviewed by Dean CB . . . . and others here on March 20, 1972. Dean CB . . . . asserts that in his conversations with you on that date that he explained to you University processes for new faculty appointments which included compliances with the University's Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Program. He also advised you of our salary ranges for new faculty appointees recently awarded the doctoral degree. Dean CB . . . . advises further that at the time of his oral discussions with you he made no firm express or implied offer to you concerning the faculty appointment under consideration.

The University is an equal opportunity employer and all deans and faculties have been directed to comply substantially and fully with our Affirmative Action Program. Dean CB . . . . was in the process of doing so before and subsequent to his interview with you. He so advised you by letter on April 18, 1972, and though he indicated at that time that he personally would recommend your appointment the affirmative action program compliances were not pro-forma and they would be time-consuming. At that point he learned through your intermediary that of your own motion, based on your unilateral reliances on your own assumptions, that you had turned down another position. We have reason to believe that you made no effort to contact Dean CB . . . . on the status of your application prior to April 10, 1972, when we are advised that you rejected an offer elsewhere. Your turn down action on another position was scarcely three weeks from the date of your visit to our campus.

To date the position for which you applied remains open.3

We sincerely regret the turn of events which has prompted your recent expressions but we must respectfully submit that they are unjustified under the circumstances.

Very Sincerely yours, WD . . . . YY . . . . Vice-President


NOTES
1.
The American Economic Association was to meet in New Orleans.
2.
The National Institute of Mental Health, a federal body which makes grants to universities for training and research in fields connected with mental health.
3.
The associate secretary of the American Association of University Professors ( AAUP) wrote to Mr. X on 3 June, 1972, that, according to the report made to her by the president of the branch of the AAUP at the university in question, it was "apparently due to budgetary constraints (that) the School of Business was unable to follow through on the discussions which you had with the acting dean in April. I understand that our chapter president does not believe that there was any suggestion from the university affirmative action office that an appointment

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