Women of the Grange: Mutuality and Sisterhood in Rural America, 1866-1920

By Donald B. Marti | Go to book overview

prominent person. Similarly, many other women leaders, notably Carr, Baird, and Mayo, were known mostly for their Grange activities; Howland, Kimball, Gifford, Buell, and Fenwick had other kinds of celebrity, but the Grange was an important outlet for all of their ambitions. It gave them, and many less conspicuous women, various measures of prominence.

Apart from their Grange activities and at least partially consequent fame, the leaders described here shared several interests and attributes. Typically high school or normal school graduates and often former teachers, they were devoted to education. Religious, in both mainline Protestant and unconventional ways, they worked for various kinds of spiritual and moral uplift. Finally, they all saw the Grange as an instrument for improving the status of women. They defined the necessary improvements differently, but they all thought that women were somehow stunted by the limitations that the conditions of rural life, male thoughtlessness, and their own unreflecting submission to custom had imposed on them. And they all thought that the Grange had a part to play in rural women's liberation.


NOTES
1.
Hesterman, "The History of Edina,"14-15; Bertels, "The National Grange,"17; Gerald L. Prescott, "Wisconsin Farm Leaders in the Gilded Age," Agricultural History 44 ( April 1970): 183-99; Lee Benson, Merchants, Farmers and Railroads ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1955); Carl Degler, At Odds: Women and the Family in America from the Revolution to the Present ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1980), 322, 335.
2.
Wagner, "Farms, Families, and Reform,"33.
3.
The Husbandman 1 ( 23 June 1875): 2; Grange Visitor 11 ( 15 January 1885): 3. Probably Mayo's speech dealt with domestic relations, which was among her favorite subjects. Mayo disparaged classical learning for its own sake; all knowledge had to be justified by practical usefulness.
4.
National Grange 5 ( 10 November 1909).
5.
Bulletin 4 ( May 1878); this is discussed in Chapter 1.
6.
Journal of Proceedings of the Fourteenth Annual Session of the Pennsylvania State Grange, 1886, 32.
7.
Pennsylvania Grange News 11 ( November 1914): 97, 109; Kenyon Butterfield makes a great point of the Order's pervasive "religious spirit" in Chapters in Rural Progress ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1909), 159.
8.
Farmer Friend and Grange Advocate 19 ( 1 October 1892): 1; the Order's relations with Catholics, Lutherans, and conservative evangelicals are considered in this study's introduction.
9.
Bulletin 4 ( August 1878); David B. Tyack and Myra H. Strober, Women and Men in the Schools: A History of the Sexual Structuring of Educational Employment ( Palo Alto: National Institute of Education, 1981), 10-11.
10.
Hebb, "The Woman Movement in the California State Grange,"47.

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women of the Grange: Mutuality and Sisterhood in Rural America, 1866-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 13
  • 1- Graces, Lecturers, and The Changing "Appearance Of Equality" 19
  • Notes 31
  • 2- Teachers, Farmers, and Famous Grangers 35
  • Notes 51
  • 3- Literary Entertainment 55
  • Notes 69
  • 4 - Drudgery and Home Economics 73
  • Notes 85
  • 5- Women's Committees 89
  • Notes 102
  • Notes 120
  • 7- Remaining Tasks and Recent Changes 125
  • Notes 138
  • Conclusion 141
  • Note on Sources 145
  • Index 153
  • About the Author 159
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 162

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.