Women of the Grange: Mutuality and Sisterhood in Rural America, 1866-1920

By Donald B. Marti | Go to book overview

response to them underlined their human significance. "This will be the last planting season for many," stated a brother, continuing her speech after she left the rostrum in tears.37

Earlier Grange women left such hard matters to the men. Now Davies speaks and writes about them in a distinctive voice, full of deeply felt sympathy for her neighbors and friends. She takes a strong interest in home economics and bakes pies, too, but is certainly less confined to women's sphere than her predecessors were. She has achieved a greater degree of "mutuality" than they did, while also continuing women's distinctive, domestic Grange activities. Clearly, the boundary between women's and men's spheres, which Grange women could always cross at some points, is now more permeable than ever.


NOTES
1.
Survey 55 ( 1 February 1926): 564.
2.
The Michigan Patron 15 ( April 1937): 10-11.
3.
Cott, The Grounding of Modern Feminism, 85.
4.
"The Story of Myself," a typescript in the Dora Stockman Papers, University Archives and Historical Collection, Michigan State University.
5.
Ibid; Dora H. Stockman, Farmerkin's Farm Rhymes ( Lansing: Henry R. Pattengill Publisher, 1911), Preface, 15.
6.
Dora H. Stockman, Book of Dialogs ( Lansing: Henry R. Pattengill Publisher, 1913), Preface, 1-6, 102-10.
7.
Happy Valley, a typescript in the Dora Stockman Papers, University Archives and Historical Collections, Michigan State University; Gene Stratton- Porter's Freckles ( 1904) and A Girl of the Limberlost ( 1909) come to mind in this connection.
8.
These sections of her dissertation are in Dora Stockman Papers, University Archives and Historical Collection, Michigan State University.
9.
Rosters of state officers in National Grange Proceedings from 1920 through 1975; see also discussion of women state officers from 1895 through 1920 in Chapter 1 and of Mary Buffington near the end of this epilogue.
10.
Gardner, The Grange, 205, 214; Journal of Proceedings of the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry, 1926, 129-30.
11.
Journal of Proceedings of the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry, 1926, 1927 and 1928, home economics committee reports.
12.
National Grange Monthly 26 ( May 1929): 8.
13.
Boston Sunday Globe 15 ( September 1929).
14.
Pennsylvania Grange News 23 ( April 1926): 4; 24 ( July 1927): 6.
15.
Journal of Proceedings of the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry, 1929, home economics report.
16.
Journal of Proceedings of the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry, 1930, home economics report; Pennsylvania Grange News 24 (March 1928): 12.
17.
Journal of Proceedings of the National Grange of Patrons of Husbandry, 1930, home economics report.

-138-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women of the Grange: Mutuality and Sisterhood in Rural America, 1866-1920
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 13
  • 1- Graces, Lecturers, and The Changing "Appearance Of Equality" 19
  • Notes 31
  • 2- Teachers, Farmers, and Famous Grangers 35
  • Notes 51
  • 3- Literary Entertainment 55
  • Notes 69
  • 4 - Drudgery and Home Economics 73
  • Notes 85
  • 5- Women's Committees 89
  • Notes 102
  • Notes 120
  • 7- Remaining Tasks and Recent Changes 125
  • Notes 138
  • Conclusion 141
  • Note on Sources 145
  • Index 153
  • About the Author 159
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 162

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.