Changing Childhood Prejudice: The Caring Work of the Schools

By Miriam M. Davidson; Florence H. Davidson | Go to book overview

8
Fostering Ideals in High School

Central Park East Secondary School has been successful with some of the most disadvantaged students in America. The combination of ideas, methods, and people that Deborah Meier has put together motivates these teenagers to do well in high school and gives them the sense that their lives have a purpose that may be fulfilled through higher education. Teachers at Central Park East Secondary School insist their school is not a paradigm for others: "It works in this community with this group of teachers and these resources," said librarian Mark Gordon. Yet, the school has several approaches in common with other successful schools we have looked at. It is organized in an intimate, relational way so no one is ignored or lost. Friendship and supportiveness are fostered. It features school-based management for less bureaucracy and higher teacher morale. And it fulfills the school's optimal role as a community center, not only through a charismatic principal who enjoys involving parents but also through teachers and the students' service activities in the surrounding neighborhoods.

Despite the calls for smaller, more focused schools by such experts as Theodore Sizer, John Goodlad, and Ernest Boyer, most high schools are still huge, impersonal institutions filled with discouraged teachers and self-centered students who frequently must attend to defending themselves from the negative attitudes of another group. Caring and moral maturity are not just neglected, they are undermined. Without serious reflection on values, students can only join what Bellah, in Habits of the Heart, calls the American culture of narcissism in which rationalization allows individual preferences to be elevated into transcendent principles. 1

Adolescent capacity for idealism is allowed to sleep. In the early 1980s, Getzels found no significant differences between the values held by freshmen and those held by seniors in each one of several high schools, then noted the same result from another researcher who waited four years to retest the same pupils. "Whatever values children

-149-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Changing Childhood Prejudice: The Caring Work of the Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - The Cognitive Roots of Prejudice 1
  • 2 - The Emotional and Social Roots of Prejudice 25
  • 3 - Prejudice Tied to Moral Judgment: A Study 49
  • 4 - Power and Favor-Trading (Stages One and Two) 77
  • 5 - Goodness, Niceness, and Higher Ideals: (Stages Three, Four, Five, and Six) 91
  • 6 - Creating Character in Early School Years 109
  • 7 - Making Choices in Middle School 129
  • 8 - Fostering Ideals in High School 149
  • 9 - Conclusion 171
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 219
  • About the Authors 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.