A New Archetype for Competitive Intelligence

By John J. McGonagle Jr.; Carolyn M. Vella | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A: COMPARATIVE TARGET PROFILE SUMMARY
I. Identification and BackgroundName: Electronic Corporation ( EC) Address: 400 Hope Drive, Detroit, MI 48111 Telephone: 313-123-4567
A. Market presence: EC is the second largest provider of information technology and management services to the lodging industry. It also operates one of the world's largest private communications networks.
B. Core competencies: In health care -- transaction processing, hardware and software applications, and network services.
C. Financial status: $155.3 million loss for the first half of fiscal 1994 (down from $334.4 million for the first half of fiscal 1993).
II. Strategic and Market Position: Relevant Division/Subsidiary/Joint Venture
A. Strategic direction
1. Vision of the market: It sees multimedia as the technologic key to this (and other) markets.
2. Plans: EC wants to be in services, not products. The appointment of Vella as division president in 1992 was a part of that; she helped develop the Practice System. Illustrating this, in January 1994, EC was running ads seeking "engagement leaders and consultants" for the consulting practice. Areas of expertise sought were as follows:
3. Recent key personnel changes: No data developed
4. Competitive alliances: EC is a partner with eleven other firms, including Photo Ltd., to build a multimedia infrastructure. EC may be involved with Transnational Consulting in an effort to adapt the PDA for use in certain contexts. (This is as yet unconfirmed.)
B. Market intentions
1. Targeted market segments
2. Resources positioned toward this market: EC has developed "centers of service" which operate across industries. They are "horizontal marketing groups," serving account managers, the sales force, and even customers.
3. Marketing/Sales Organization: Each operating unit has its own sales and marketing group which, in turn, has its own systems support unit for handling systems integration bids and proposals.
4. Pricing strategy: National Consulting is regarded as the most expensive on the market. EC is its major competitor, charging less. However, National justifies its price differential on the basis that it "delivers more."

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A New Archetype for Competitive Intelligence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - About This Book 3
  • Note 4
  • 2 - Why Is Intelligence Important Today -- and More Important Tomorrow? 5
  • Appendix: National Interests in Intelligence 10
  • Notes 11
  • 3 - The Building Blocks of Cyber-IntelligenceTM 13
  • Appendix: Reengineering and Downsizing 19
  • Notes 20
  • 4 - Cyber-IntelligenceTM in the Modern Corporation 23
  • Appendix: Case Study -- How Pervasive is Cyber-Intelligence in Modern Businesses? 34
  • Notes 36
  • II - The Building Blocks of Cyber-intelligenceTM 37
  • 5 - Competitive Intelligence 39
  • How Does CI Relate to the Other Building Blocks of Cyber-IntelligenceTM? 44
  • Notes 49
  • 6 - Strategic Intelligence 51
  • Notes 54
  • 7 - Market Intelligence 57
  • Notes 60
  • 8 - Crisis Management 63
  • Notes 66
  • 9 - Benchmarking 69
  • Notes 82
  • 10 Reverse Engineering 85
  • Notes 90
  • 11 - Defensive (Counter) Intelligence 91
  • Notes 96
  • 12 - The Building Blocks of Cyber-IntelligenceTM: Charting the Relationships 97
  • III - Using Cyber-IntelligenceTM 99
  • Notes 105
  • 13 - Data Gathering: An Overview of Sources 107
  • Notes 117
  • 14 - Data Gathering: An Overview of Techniques 119
  • Appendix: Case Study 129
  • Notes 132
  • 15 - Data Analyses 133
  • Appendix A: Comparative Target Profile Summary 146
  • Appendix B: Strategic Analysis Report Form 147
  • Appendix C: Communicating Conclusions 150
  • APPENDIX B: STRATEGIC ANALYSIS REPORT FORM 151
  • 16 - Using Cyber-IntelligenceTM Intelligently 153
  • Appendix A: Using Cyber-Intelligence in Strategic Planning 174
  • Appendix B: Case Study -- CI Supporting Other Intelligence Functions 178
  • APPENDIX B: CASE STUDY -- CI SUPPORTING OTHER INTELLIGENCE FUNCTIONS 179
  • 17 - Critical Management Issues 183
  • Notes 190
  • 18 - The Future of Cyber-IntelligenceTM 191
  • A - U.S.-Based Organizations Involved with Some Aspect of Cyber-IntelligenceTM 193
  • B - Selected Internet World Wide Web Sites 195
  • Glossary 201
  • Select Bibliography 209
  • Index to Forms and Checklists 217
  • Index to Case Studies 219
  • Index 221
  • About the Authors *
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