The Critical Response to Katherine Mansfield

By Jan Pilditch | Go to book overview
4
Radio New Zealand Concert Programme, "The New Zealand Stories of Katherine Mansfield", radio talks with associated readings adapted for radio and other adaptations and dramatisations, approximately 18 stories in all.
5
Craig Thaine, Today's Day ( Wellington: Playmarket, 1983).
6
Elizabeth O'Connor, Bright Birds ( Wellington: Playmarket, 1988).
7
Radio New Zealand Concert Programme, dramatised readings in 20 parts from Antony Alpers , The Life of Katherine Mansfield ( New York: Viking Press, 1988).
8
A Portrait of Katherine Mansfield, a film written and researched by Gillian Boddy, directed by Julianne Stretton, Marigold Productions, 1986.
9
Sophie Tomlinson, "Mans-field in Bookform", Landfall, 156 ( December, 1985), pp. 465-473.
10
Brian McNeill, The Two Tigers ( Wellington: Price Milburn, 1977). p. 10.
11
Brian McNeill, The Love and Ladies Man ( Wellington: Playmarket, 1988).
12
I owe the information in this paragraph to personal conversations with Cathy Downes.
13
A cassette type of The Case of Katherine Mansfield made from an amalgam of recordings from the ABC and from London performances is available from Cathy Downes , 51 Ferry Road, Days Bay, Wellington.
14
Vincent O'Sullivan, Jones & Jones, Wellington, 1988; premiered at Downstage Theatre, Wellington, 30 September 1988.
15
Alma de Groen, The Rivers of China ( Sydney: Currency Press, 1988); opened at Downstage Theatre, Wellington, 7 October 1988.
16
All page references are to Alma de Groen, op.cit.

Shifen Gong, "Katherine Mansfield: A Chinese
Perspective"

In a recent article exploring the reason for Ibsen's powerful influence on modern Chinese drama, the Chinese critic Yi Xinnong argued that a 'universal law' governed the influence of a writer on another culture:

Any significant influence that a foreign writer exerts on another country is chiefly determined by the necessity of its social and literary development. 1

Although this formulation--with its vocabulary of 'universal law(s)', determinism and necessity--is heavily infected by what would now be called vulgar Marxism, there is no doubt that the social and literary context of the 'host' country is a significant factor in the reception of a foreign author. As has been pointed out, Mansfield attracted the interest of Chinese translators, critics, readers, and fiction writers at two key points of momentous social, political and cultural change in China. The first occurred at a time of general opening up of Chinese culture to the West in the early decades of the century, after several centuries in which a closed, decaying imperial order had carried with it an entrenched, rigid and rule-bound literary classicism that tended to stifle

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