The Critical Response to Katherine Mansfield

By Jan Pilditch | Go to book overview
7
Lin Tonghua, 'Lüe lun dong fang mei xue de te zheng' ('A Talk on the Characteristics of Oriental Aesthetics'), p. 7.
8
Ezra Pound, "'Chinese Poetry'", To-Day III, April-May, 1918, pp. 54-57, 93-95. Quoted in Hugo Witemeyer, The Poetry of Ezra Pound, California: University of California Press, [ 1969], 1981, p. 147.
10
In a letter to John Middleton Murry on June 5, 1918, she wrote, of Waley's translation: "Oh, how lovely these Chinese poems are. I shall carry them about with me as a sort of wavy branch all day to hide behinda fan . . ." See The Collected Letters of Katherine Mansfield, ed. Vincent O'Sullivan with Margaret Scott, Vol. 2 ( 1918- 1919), 1987, p. 220.
11
One Hundred & Seventy Chinese Poems, translated by Arthur Waley, London: Constable, first edition 1918, reprinted 1942, pp. 81-82.
12
Lin Tonghua, "'Lüe lun dong fang mei xue de te zheng' ('A Talk on the Characteristics of Oriental Aesthetics')", P. 9.
13
The Stories of Katherine Mansfield, ed. Antony Alpers, p. 469.
14
Xu Zhimo, 'Man shu fei er' ('Mansfield'), "Xu Zhimo quan ji: san wen ji (jia, yi)" [Collected Works of Xu Zhimo: Collected Prose (A, B)], Hong Kong: The Commercial Press, 1983, p. 19.

Witi Ihimaera, "Dear Katherine Mansfield" from Dear Miss Mansfield: A Tribute to Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp

Dear Katherine Mansfield, On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of your birth, may I offer you this small homage as a personal tribute to your life and your art. Throughout the past year many, many people from all over the world have wished to say 'thank you' for illuminating our lives and our literature. Mine is but a single token of aroha and respect.

Miss Mansfield, we in New Zealand have laid proud claim to you because you were born and brought up a New Zealander. Although you spent most of your adult years in England and the Continent, you always looked back to these southern antipodean islands as the main source for your stories. On our part, we have long since acknowledged that New Zealand could not fulfil your expectations of Life, Art, Literature and Experience. The world was waiting in England, Germany, Switzerland, Italy and France. And out of all those restless voyages of the intellect, mind, heart and soul, out of that singular life, came the stories. Better people than I have praised their fine art, their subtle craft and their focus on inner truth. They are stories spun sometimes from gossamer, at other times from strong sinew, sometimes kept afloat by a strength of voice, at other times by a mere thread of breath. Near the end, they were stories grabbed from

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